Don Bradman Dies, 92

Sir Donald Bradman, the great Australian Test cricketer, has died at his Adelaide home. He was 92.

Once lauded by Prime Minister John Howard as the greatest Australian of the twentieth century, Bradman’s death will see an outpouring of sympathy and sporting memories rarely witnessed.

Between 1928 and 1948, Bradman played in 52 Test matches. He scored 6,996 runs and averaged 99.94 per innings, a record that has never been matched, before or since.

Speaking on radio this morning, the Prime Minister said: “He was more than just a great cricketer and a great sportsman, he was a dominant Australian personality in a way that I don’t think any other person has been in the last 100 years.”

Howard said Bradman was “a person of quite restless intelligence and someone who preserved a great respect for the values that he thought were important about behaviour, not only on the sporting field but also in life generally.”

The Federal Opposition Leader, Kim Beazley, told reporters today that Bradman had once written to his father, Kim Beazley senior, with a set of exercises for the younger Kim, to assist him with problems arising from polio.

Beazley remembered his mother saying: “Well, Don Bradman says you have got to do this so you better do it.”


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