Scotland Votes NO In Referendum On Independence

Scotland has voted against independence from Great Britain in a referendum that saw the YES campaign garner just 44.7% of the vote.

The NO vote swept the country with 55.3%. Of the 32 Council areas in Scotland, only 4 voted YES: Dundee (57.3%), and the neighbouring areas of Glasgow (53.5%), North Lanarkshire (51.1%) and West Dunbartonshire (54%).

Cameron

Whilst Glasgow supported the referendum, Edinburgh cast a decisive 61.1% against independence. In Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire, the NO vote reached 58.6% and 60.4%. The highest NO vote was in the northernmost Orkney Islands archipelago where 67.2% of 17,806 voters rejected the proposal.

A total of 4,283,790 votes were cast across Scotland with 2,001,926 NO votes and 1,617,989 votes for YES.

The Scottish First Minister, Alex Salmond, has accepted defeat and called for the country to unite. The leader of the Better Together No campaign, Alistair Darling, the former Labour Chancellor of the Exchequer, has addressed campaign workers. Prime Minister David Cameron has also made a statement outside No.10 Downing Street.

UPDATE: Alex Salmond has announced that he will stand down as First Minister and leader of the Scottish National Party.

  • Listen to Darling (6m)
  • Watch Darling (3m)
  • Watch Salmond (8m)
  • Listen to Cameron (7m)
  • Watch Cameron (7m)

Statement from Queen Elizabeth II.

The Queen’s message following Scotland’s referendum

After many months of discussion, debate, and careful thought, we now know the outcome of the Referendum, and it is a result that all of us throughout the United Kingdom will respect.

For many in Scotland and elsewhere today, there will be strong feelings and contrasting emotions – among family, friends and neighbours. That, of course, is the nature of the robust democratic tradition we enjoy in this country. But I have no doubt that these emotions will be tempered by an understanding of the feelings of others.

Now, as we move forward, we should remember that despite the range of views that have been expressed, we have in common an enduring love of Scotland, which is one of the things that helps to unite us all. Knowing the people of Scotland as I do, I have no doubt that Scots, like others throughout the United Kingdom, are able to express strongly-held opinions before coming together again in a spirit of mutual respect and support, to work constructively for the future of Scotland and indeed all parts of this country.

My family and I will do all we can to help and support you in this important task.

ELIZABETH R.

Edinburgh News

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