2016 House Of Representatives Primary Votes: State-By-State Breakdown

Despite a declining vote, the Coalition and the ALP maintained their dominance of the House of Representatives in the July 2 double dissolution.

The Coalition (Liberal, Liberal National, Nationals, Country Liberals) and ALP polled 76.77% of the nationwide primary vote, down 2.16% from 78.93% in 2013. They secured 145 (96.7%) of the 150 seats in the House of Representatives.

The Big Two + Greens

The Greens polled 10.23% of the primary vote, up 1.58% from their 2013 tally of 8.65%. Adam Bandt consolidated his hold on Melbourne but the party failed to win any more lower house seats.

The Coalition, ALP and Greens combined polled 87% of first preference (primary) votes nationally, marginally down from 87.58% in 2013. They won 146 (97.3%) of the 150 seats in the House of Representatives.

The Greens maintained their influence with the lion’s share of preferences. These preferences were vital to the ALP holding 8 of its seats and winning another 7 from the Liberal Party.

A Big Field of Micro Parties With Micro Votes

There were 42 parties that contested at least one seat each. They polled a total of 10.17%. Only the Nick Xenophon Team (Mayo) and Katter’s Australian Party (Kennedy) won seats.

The majority of micro parties (32 of 42) contested 10 or fewer seats. Twenty-four of these contested 5 or fewer seats. Whilst 10 parties ran more than 10 candidates each, they all nominated candidates for fewer than half the seats in the House. Family First ran in 65 seats, the Christian Democratic Party in 55 and the Animal Justice Party in 41.

The votes for micro parties were derisory, with 38 of the 42 failing to make it to 1% nationally. Moreover, 27 polled less than 0.1% nationally. The other 11 polled no higher than 0.7%.

Just four parties polled more than 1% nationally: Nick Xenophon Team (1.85%), Family First (1.49%), Christian Democratic Party (1.31%) and Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (1.29%). However, these parties contested only certain seats in particular states, concentrating their resources on particular lower house seats or Senate positions. Xenophon won one seat in the House and three in the Senate, whilst One Nation won four Senate seats and Family First secured one.

Katter’s Australian Party nominated 12 candidates, all in Queensland, but only Bob Katter was elected, winning his ninth term as the member for Kennedy.

Independents

A total of 110 independent and non-affiliated candidates secured 2.83% of the primary vote.

Only 24 (21.8%) of these 110 candidates polled over 4% and received election funding.

Two independents, both incumbent MPs, won seats: Andrew Wilkie (Denison) and Cathy McGowan (Indi). For the third election in a row, Wilkie improved his primary (up 5.99% to 44.07%) and two-party vote (up 2.27% to 65.51%). McGowan won a second term and also lifted her primary (up 3.58% to 34.76%) and two-party (up 4.58% to 54.83% votes.

The table on this page shows the primary (first preference) votes for all parties and groups in the 2016 House of Representatives elections. It shows the number of candidates each party nominated in the House, the total number of votes won, and the national and state vote percentages. The parties are listed in descending order of their national primary votes.

2016 House of Representatives Election – Primary Votes for Parties
Party Seats Votes National
%
NSW
%
Vic
%
Qld
%
WA
%
SA
%
Tas
%
ACT
%
NT
%
Liberal Party
107
3,882,905
28.67
32.68
37.01
45.70
35.09
35.44
34.56
Liberal National Party (LNP-Qld
30
1,153,736
8.52
43.19
The Nationals
22
624,555
4.61
9.64
4.75
3.00
Country Liberals (NT)
2
32,409
0.24
33.25
Liberal/Nationals/LNP/CLP Coalition
150
5,693,605
42.04
Australian Labor Party
150
4,702,296
34.73
36.93
35.58
30.91
32.45
31.55
37.90
44.27
40.39
The Greens
150
1,385,650
10.23
8.95
13.13
8.83
12.06
6.21
10.22
15.09
9.09
Independents (Combined)
108
380,712
2.81
3.94
2.72
1.89
1.30
0.74
8.75
1.86
5.88
Nick Xenophon Team
18
250,333
1.85
0.37
0.06
0.41
21.26
Family First
65
201,222
1.49
0.27
1.30
3.89
3.93
Christian Democratic Party
55
178,026
1.31
3.89
0.16
1.89
Pauline Hanson’s One Nation
15
175,020
1.29
0.63
5.52
Animal Justice Party
41
94,516
0.70
0.47
1.89
0.85
Katter’s Australian Party
12
72,879
0.54
2.73
Rise Up Australia Party
31
68,418
0.51
0.02
1.15
0.17
1.56
2.55
Liberal Democrats (LDP)
33
66,261
0.49
0.46
0.38
0.96
0.19
0.21
0.41
1.31
Australian Christians
18
43,150
0.32
0.26
2.56
Australian Liberty Alliance
10
25,337
0.19
0.26
0.46
0.12
Drug Law Reform
11
20,350
0.15
0.10
0.33
0.17
Derryn Hinch’s Justice Party
6
16,885
0.12
0.07
0.40
Shooters, Fishers and Farmers
6
15,477
0.11
0.08
0.04
0.45
4.70
Science Party
10
14,988
0.11
0.34
Bullet Train For Australia
4
14,078
0.10
0.05
0.03
4.22
Australian Sex Party
6
12,683
0.09
0.05
0.30
Australian Recreational Fishers
3
11,254
0.08
3.35
Glenn Lazarus Team
3
10,094
0.07
0.38
Renewable Energy Party
8
8,642
0.06
0.01
0.10
1.35
Online Direct Democracy
10
8,511
0.06
0.13
0.04
0.10
0.38
Australian Country Party
3
7,033
0.05
0.20
Australia First Party (NSW) Incorporated
4
6,895
0.05
0.07
0.09
0.82
The Arts Party
7
6,821
0.05
0.07
0.02
0.05
0.50
Mature Australia Party
4
5,888
0.04
0.04
0.03
0.24
Citizens Electoral Council
7
5,175
0.04
0.06
0.06
0.46
Australian Defence Veterans Party
4
4,360
0.03
0.03
0.11
Non-Custodial Parents Party
2
3,663
0.03
0.08
Socialist Alliance
4
3,653
0.03
0.01
0.05
0.10
CountryMinded
2
3,478
0.03
0.03
0.08
Australian Equality Party (Marriage)
3
3,296
0.02
0.10
DLP – Democratic Labour Party
3
3,166
0.02
0.02
0.06
0.19
Non Affiliated
2
2,958
0.02
0.05
0.03
Outdoor Recreation Party (Stop The Greens)
1
2,375
0.02
0.18
Consumer Rights & No-Tolls
1
2,050
0.02
0.08
Socialist Equality Party
3
1,608
0.01
0.03
0.01
Australian Antipaedophile Party
1
1,527
0.01
0.03
Smokers Rights Party
1
1,343
0.01
0.03
Pirate Party
1
1,260
0.01
0.03
Marijuana (HEMP) Party
1
1,143
0.01
1.17
Australian Cyclists Party
2
846
0.01
0.01
0.01
Sustainable Australia
1
606
0.00
0.01
Palmer United Party
1
315
0.00
0.01
Australian Progressives
1
282
0.00
0.01

Source: Australian Electoral Commission publications.

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