How Well Did Pauline Hanson’s One Nation Do In The Federal Election?

The tables on this page show the level of electoral support for Pauline Hanson’s One Nation at the 2016 federal election.

Hanson

One Nation ran 15 candidates in the House of Representatives, 12 in Queensland and 3 in NSW. It ran a Senate ticket in each State but not in the territories.

Nationally, One Nation polled 4.26% in the Senate, including 9.03% in Queensland, where Pauline Hanson has been elected a senator. A Senate quota is 7.7% of the primary vote in a double dissolution election. Hanson secured 1.17 quotas and will win on primary votes alone. She will return to the Parliament for the first time since she lost the seat of Oxley in 1998. She won Oxley as a disendorsed Liberal candidate in 1996.

In the House of Representatives, One Nation polled 1.28% nationally and 5.48% in Queensland. Even though it only contested 12 seats, it polled the fourth highest proportion of the primary vote in Queensland, behind the LNP (43.15%), the ALP (31.43%) and the Greens (8.51%). Family First and Katter’s Australian Party took the next two places. [Read more…]


Turnbull Likely To Win Narrowly As Voters Punish Coalition; ALP Secures Nationwide Swing Of 3.18% But Falls Short

Hung Parliament Still Likely; Many Close Seats; Nationwide Swing Delivers ALP Gains; Xenophon Wins Lower House Seat; Pauline Hanson, Derryn Hinch And Jacqui Lambie Elected To Senate

TurnbullPrime Minister Malcolm Turnbull addressed Liberal supporters in Sydney last night

The Turnbull coalition government is clinging to office, following yesterday’s federal election, and may yet face a hung parliament controlled by crossbenchers not necessarily sympathetic to it. In a post-midnight speech, the Prime Minister insisted the coalition would be able to form a majority government.

A nationwide 3.18% swing towards the ALP sees the coalition leading the two-party-preferred vote with 50.01%. Every state and territory swung to the ALP, the Northern Territory leading the field with 7.37% and delivering Solomon to the ALP. The smallest swing was 0.68% in the Australian Capital Territory, where the ALP already held both seats and polled 61.73% of the two-party vote.

There was a 3.64% swing to the ALP in New South Wales. The ALP has won Banks, Barton, Dobell, Eden-Monaro, Lindsay, Macarthur, Macquarie and Paterson.

In Victoria, the swing was 2.13% but it appears that only one seat has changed hands. The ALP lost Chisholm, the eastern suburban Melbourne electorate held since 1998 by the former Speaker, Anna Burke. The Greens came close to winning Batman and counting may yet throw Melbourne Ports into doubt for the ALP.

In Queensland, a swing of 2.75% delivered Longman to the ALP and ended the two-term career of 26-year-old Wyatt Roy. The LNP electorates of Capricornia, Forde and Petrie are too close to call. Hinkler may also be in play.

In Western Australia, a 3.82% swing has delivered the new electorate of Burt to the ALP, giving it 4 of the 16 seats.

Tasmania swung decisively by 6.33% to the ALP and it picked up 3 seats lost in 2013: Bass, Braddon and Lyons.

In South Australia, a swing of 4.44% saw two seats change hands. The ALP’s Steve Georganas regained Hindmarsh, which he lost in 2013. The Liberal Party lost the seat of Mayo to the Nick Xenophon Team. NXT may yet have a chance of taking the large country electorate of Grey.

A range of commentators last night agreed that the coalition would likely be able to form a government with 76-78 seats. The large number of close results means that it will be up to ten days before the results are clear.

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Triumphant Shorten Says The ALP Is Back; Turnbull Delivers Late-Night Off-Key Speech To Supporters

The closeness of the count delayed the appearance of the Prime Minister and Opposition Leader. Shorten appeared first, after 11pm. He told supporters in Melbourne that the ALP was “back”. He reiterated his campaign themes and said that the ALP would save Medicare “in government or opposition”.

Malcolm Turnbull spoke to Liberal supporters at 12.30am, delivering a speech widely panned as off-key and inappropriate. Turnbull spoke at length about thuggery in the construction industry and defended his decision to call the double dissolution. He insisted that the coalition would be able to form a majority government.

  • Watch Shorten’s speech (11m)
  • Listen to Shorten (11m)
  • Watch Turnbull’s speech (16m)
  • Listen to Turnbull (16m)

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Windsor and Oakeshott Defeated; Existing Crossbenchers Re-Elected

Tony Windsor, the former member for New England, failed to defeat Nationals leader Barnaby Joyce. Windsor polled 29.73% but Joyce won the seat outright with a primary vote of 52.09%. [Read more…]


A Cautionary Tale: Senate Votes In The 2013 Federal Election

Aside from the Coalition, ALP and Greens, just five parties were able to poll above 1% nationally in the last Senate election.

The Palmer United Party, Liberal Democrats, Nick Xenophon Group, Sex Party and Family First each managed to reach 1% nationally in the 2013 federal election. They polled higher numbers in particular states and managed to win seats. Only the Sex Party failed to elect a senator.

A further 46 groups polled less than 1% each. Nineteen of these failed to make it to 0.5%. Twenty-five groups failed to poll more than 0.66% and will not contest this year’s election. Only Ricky Muir from this group of 46 managed to win election to the Senate and that was due to group voting ticket preference deals which have now been abolished. [Read more…]


Parties And Groups Contesting The Senate In The 2016 Federal Election

Nominations for the 2016 Federal Election closed today.

The table on this page shows the parties and groups contesting the Senate in the 6 states and 2 territories.

A cell is shaded yellow if a particular party/group is contesting that state/territory.

The major parties are listed first. Other groups are listed in alphabetical order but I have made some rearrangements to take account of groups combining forces in various states/territories. Most groups have nominated two or three candidates. [Read more…]


Breakdown Of House Nominations: 2016 Federal Election

Nominations for the federal election closed today.

The table below shows the number of nominations in House of Representatives seats, broken down by state.

A total of 994 candidates have nominated for the 150 seats in the House. This is 194 fewer than the record 1,188 candidates at the 2013 House election.

The average number of candidates per seat is 6.6.

The smallest number of nominations is 3 in the Victorian electorate of Gorton, held by the ALP’s Brendan O’Connor.

Seven seats have the largest number of nominations, 11 each. They are: Grayndler and Lindsay (NSW); Batman, Dunkley and Murray (Vic); Longman (Qld); and Solomon (NT).

A further eight seats have 10 nominations each. They are: New England, Sydney and Warringah (NSW); and Corangamite, Gippsland, Indi, La Trobe and Wills (Vic). [Read more…]


Election Funding Payments: 2004 Federal Election

This table shows the election funding payments made to political parties and candidates following the 2004 federal election.

A candidate or Senate needs four per cent of the primary vote to be eligible for election funding. The amount is calculated by multiplying the number of votes obtained by the current funding rate.

The funding rate for the 2004 election was 194.397 cents per House of Representatives and Senate vote.

Just under $42 million was distributed to parties and candidates. [Read more…]


Senator Len Harris – One Nation How-To-Vote

This is the One Nation Queensland how-to-vote card for the 2004 Federal Election.

Senator Len Harris was the sitting One Nation senator, seeking re-election to a second term. He had been appointed to the position in 1999, after the elected senator, Heather Hill, was disqualified under Section 44 if the Constitution for not renouncing her UK citizenship.

One Nation polled just 3.14% of the primary vote in the Queensland Senate election, a drop of 6.88% from the 2001 election. Harris served out the remainder of his term and left the Senate on June 30, 2005. [Read more…]