Quiz: Parliament

Parliament

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Question 1
How does the Australian Constitution define "Parliament"?
A
Prime Minister, Government and Opposition
B
House of Representatives and Senate
C
Queen, House of Representatives and Senate
D
Governor-General, House of Representatives and Senate
Question 1 Explanation: 
Section 1 of the Australian Constitution defines the Parliament as consisting of "the Queen, a Senate, and a House of Representatives".

The Queen, or her representative, the Governor-General is considered part of the Parliament because royal assent is required for all legislation passed by the two houses. In practice, this assent is always given because the Queen and the Governor-General act on the advice of the Prime Minister.
Question 2
How many members are there in the House of Representatives?
A
76
B
96
C
125
D
150
Question 2 Explanation: 
There are currently 150 members of the House of Representatives.
Question 3
How many members of the House of Representatives were there following the first federal election of 1901?
A
50
B
75
C
100
D
125
Question 3 Explanation: 
There were 75 members of the first House of Representatives.

In 1949, the House was increased in size to 121 members. In 1984, it was increased to 148.
Question 4
How many members of the Senate are there?
A
36
B
60
C
72
D
76
Question 4 Explanation: 
There are currently 76 senators.

Each state has 12 senators (6x12=72) and each territory has 2 senators (2x2=4)
Question 5
How many members of the Senate were there in 1901?
A
18
B
24
C
30
D
36
Question 5 Explanation: 
There were 36 senators in 1901. Each state was represented by 6 senators.
Question 6
The presiding officer of the House of Representatives is known as what?
A
The President
B
The Prime Minister
C
The Speaker
D
The Governor-General
Question 7
The presiding officer of the Senate is known as what?
A
Black Rod
B
The President
C
The Speaker
D
The Leader of the Government
Question 7 Explanation: 
The President is the presiding officer of the Senate. He or she is a Senator who has been elected by the Senate.
Question 8
How long are the terms of the House of Representatives?
A
2 years
B
3 years
C
4 years
D
5 years
Question 8 Explanation: 
Section 1 of the Constitution stipulates that the House of Representatives is elected for three years.

The term dates from the first meeting of the House following an election.
Question 9
Which statement best describes the terms of territory senators, those elected in the Australian Capital Territory or the Northern Territory?
A
Territory senators serve a term concurrent with the parliament in their territory.
B
Territory senators serve a term concurrent with the House of Representatives, to a maximum of three years.
C
Territory senators serve fixed six-year terms, with half facing election every three years.
D
Territory senators serve fixed three-year terms, with all senators facing the electorate every three years.
Question 9 Explanation: 
Territory senators are elected at every House of Representatives election. Their term is concurrent with the House, to a maximum of three years.

Senators from the states are elected for fixed six-year terms, with half being chosen every three years.
Question 10
What happens when a member of the House of Representatives dies or resigns?
A
Their party nominates a person to take their place until the next general election takes place.
B
The Governor-General nominates a person to take their place until the next general election takes place.
C
The relevant State Parliament nominates a person to take their place until the next general election takes place.
D
A by-election is held, in which the people elect a replacement to represent the seat until the next general election takes places.
Question 10 Explanation: 
A by-election takes place. Members of the House who die or resign are always replaced by a new member elected by the voters in the relevant electorate.

If the vacancy occurs close to the scheduled election, a by-election may not necessarily take place.
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Quiz: 2013 Federal Election

2013 Federal Election

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Question 1
Which party or parties won the 2013 Federal Election?
A
Liberal Party
B
Australian Labor Party
C
Australian Greens
D
The Nationals
E
Liberal-Nationals Coalition
F
ALP-Greens Coalition
Question 1 Explanation: 
The Liberal and Nationals Coalition won the election. The Liberal Party won 58 seats, whilst the Qld LNP won 22 seats, The Nationals 9 and the NT CLP 1. Together, the Coalition won 90 seats.

The ALP won 55 seats, the Greens 1, Palmer United Party 1, and independents 3.
Question 2
How many seats did the ALP lose in this election?
A
7
B
17
C
27
D
37
Question 2 Explanation: 
The ALP lost 17 seats to the coalition in the election: 8 in NSW, 3 in Victoria, 3 in Tasmania, 2 in Queensland and 1 in South Australia. They won a total of 55 seats.

The Coalition picked up an additional two seats from independents (New England & Lyne) but lost two (Indi & Fairfax) to an independent and the Palmer United Party.
Question 3
What percentage of the national two-party-preferred vote did the ALP win?
A
43.51%
B
44.51%
C
45.51%
D
46.51%
Question 3 Explanation: 
The ALP polled 46.51% of the two-party-preferred vote, compared to 53.49% for the Coalition.

This was on a par with the 2PP achieved when Bob Hawke won in 1983, John Howard won in 1996 and Kevin Rudd won in 2007.
Question 4
In which state or territory did the Coalition poll its highest two-party-preferred vote?
A
Tasmania
B
South Australia
C
Western Australia
D
Northern Territory
Question 4 Explanation: 
Western Australia was the Coalition's best state, with 58.28% of the two-party-preferred vote.

The Liberal Party won 12 of the 15 seats.
Question 5
In which state or territory did the Australian Labor Party poll its highest two-party-preferred vote?
A
Australian Capital Territory
B
Tasmania
C
Victoria
D
South Australia
Question 5 Explanation: 
The ALP's two-party vote was highest in the Australian Capital Territory: 59.91%.

There are only 2 seats in the ACT and the ALP holds both.
Question 6
How many independents were elected in the House of Representatives at this election?
A
2
B
3
C
4
D
5
Question 6 Explanation: 
There were 2 independents elected: Andrew Wilkie in Denison (Tas) and Cathy McGowan in Indi (Vic).

Adam Bandt won Melbourne (Vic) for the Greens, Bob Katter won Kennedy (Qld for Katter's Australian Party and Clive Palmer won Fairfax (Qld) for the Palmer United Party.
Question 7
How many Palmer United Party Senate candidates were successful at this election?
A
2
B
3
C
4
D
5
Question 7 Explanation: 
There were 3 Palmer United Party candidates elected to the Senate: Glenn Lazarus (Qld), Jacqui Lambie (Tas) and Zhenya Wang (WA).

As of March 2015, Lazarus and Lambie have both left PUP. Senator Wang and Clive Palmer are the remaining parliamentary representatives.
Question 8
What was the national informal vote in the House of Representatives at this election?
A
4.91%
B
5.91%
C
6.91%
D
7.91%
Question 8 Explanation: 
The informal vote was 5.91%. It was highest in NSW (7.59%) and lowest in the ACT (3.83%).

It was the highest informal vote in the House since 1984, when it reached 6.3%, a figure widely believed to have been caused by confusion with the introduction of above-the-line voting in the Senate.
Question 9
What was the national informal vote in the Senate at this election?
A
4.96%
B
3.96%
C
2.96%
D
1.96%
Question 9 Explanation: 
The Senate informal vote was 2.96%, down from 3.75% in 2010.

It was highest in Victoria (3.37%) and lowest in the ACT (1.98%).

Prior to the introduction of above-the-line voting in 1984, the informal vote hit 9.9% in the Senate in 1983.
Question 10
What percentage of the primary vote did the Australian Greens poll in the House of Representatives at this election?
A
12.65%
B
10.65%
C
8.65%
D
6.65%
Question 10 Explanation: 
The Greens polled 8.65% of the primary vote. This was 3.11% down on their 2010 result of 11.76%.

Even though their vote declined substantially, Adam Bandt was comfortably re-elected in Melbourne and all of the Greens senators were returned, with Janet Rice picking up an extra Senate seat in Victoria.
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Quiz: Australian Prime Ministers

Australian Prime Ministers

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Question 1
How many Labor prime ministers have there been since 1901?
A
9
B
10
C
11
D
12
Question 1 Explanation: 
12 of Australia's 28 prime ministers have represented the Australian Labor Party.

The first was John Christian Watson in 1904. He was followed by Andrew Fisher in 1908, who formed the first majority Labor government in 1910 and the first majority government since Federation. After his third term, Fisher was succeeded by William Morris Hughes, who subsequently split the party over conscription and joined with his conservative opponents. James Scullin won office in 1929 and was followed by John Curtin in 1941, Frank Forde in 1945 and Ben Chifley in 1945. Following a long period in opposition, Gough Whitlam won office in 1972 and was followed by Bob Hawke in 1983, Paul Keating in 1991, Kevin Rudd in 2007 and Julia Gillard in 2010.
Question 2
Which prime minister served the shortest term in office?
A
Arthur Fadden
B
Earle Page
C
Frank Forde
D
John McEwen
Question 2 Explanation: 
Frank Forde was prime minister for 8 days in 1945, following the death of John Curtin. Forde was deputy leader of the ALP but the party chose Ben Chifley to be the new leader.

Fadden was PM for 1 month, 9 days, McEwen for 23 days and Page for 20 days.
Question 3
Which prime minister contested the most elections as leader of his or her party?
A
Bob Hawke
B
John Howard
C
Robert Menzies
D
Alfred Deakin
Question 3 Explanation: 
Menzies. He contested 9 elections as leader of the United Australia Party (1940) and the Liberal Party (1946, 1949, 1951, 1954, 1955, 1958, 1961 and 1963). He won 8 of these - 1946 was his only defeat.

His 7 consecutive victories between 1949 and 1963 is unlikely ever to be matched.
Question 4
Who was the first incumbent or former prime minister to die?
A
Edmund Barton
B
Alfred Deakin
C
John "Chris" Watson
D
George Reid
Question 4 Explanation: 
Australia's 4th prime minister, George Reid, was the first to die, in 1918.

He was followed by Alfred Deakin in 1919 and Edmund Barton in 1920. Watson died in 1941.
Question 5
How many Australian Prime Ministers subsequently served as High Commissioner to London?
A
1
B
2
C
3
D
4
Question 5 Explanation: 
4. George Reid (1910-16), Andrew Fisher (1916-20), Joseph Cook (1821-27) and Stanley Melbourne Bruce (1933-45) all served as High Commissioner to London after first serving as prime minister.
Question 6
Which Australian prime minister lived the longest and also lived the longest time after leaving office?
A
William Morris Hughes
B
Stanley Melbourne Bruce
C
Frank Forde
D
Gough Whitlam
Question 6 Explanation: 
Gough Whitlam holds both records. He was 98 when he died in October 2014. He had lived for 38 years and 11 months after being dismissed on November 11, 1975.
Question 7
How many prime ministers have held office more than once, in non-consecutive terms?
A
2
B
3
C
4
D
5
Question 7 Explanation: 
4. Alfred Deakin, Andrew Fisher, Robert Menzies and Kevin Rudd all held office more than once in non-consecutive terms. Deakin and Fisher each had 3 terms, whilst Menzies and Rudd had 2.
Question 8
Which prime minister won the largest-ever victory, in terms of seats, in the House of Representatives?
A
Bob Hawke
B
Malcolm Fraser
C
Harold Holt
D
Joseph Lyons
Question 8 Explanation: 
Malcolm Fraser. In 1975, Fraser's Liberal-National coalition won 91 of the 127 seats in the House of Representatives - 71.65%. Fraser had been Opposition Leader but fought the election as prime minister following the Governor-General's dismissal of Gough Whitlam on November 11.
Question 9
How many prime ministers took office for the first time after leading their party/parties to victory at a general election?
A
8
B
10
C
12
D
14
Question 9 Explanation: 
8. Joseph Cook (1913), James Scullin (1929), Joseph Lyons (1931), Gough Whitlam (1972), Bob Hawke (1983), John Howard (1996), Kevin Rudd (2007) and Tony Abbott (2013) all led their parties to victory at general elections and became prime minister for the first time.

Stanley Melbourne Bruce became PM after the 1922 election, but he had not led his party during the election. When the Nationalists failed to secure an outright majority, the Country Party insisted on Hughes's replacement as their price for supporting the government.

Menzies led the coalition to victory in 1949 but he had previously become PM following the death of Lyons.
Question 10
Of Australia's 28 prime ministers (including Tony Abbott), how many were born in the 20th century?
A
10
B
12
C
14
D
16
Question 10 Explanation: 
12. Most of Australia's 28 PMs were born in the 19th century.

Those born in the 20th century were: John McEwen (1900), William McMahon (1908), Harold Holt (1908), John Gorton (1911), Gough Whitlam (1916), Bob Hawke (1929), Malcolm Fraser (1930), John Howard (1939), Paul Keating (1944), Kevin Rudd (1957), Tony Abbott (1957) and Julia Gillard (1961).
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Reserve Bank Cuts Interest Rates By 0.25%

The Reserve Bank of Australia has cut the cash rate by 0.25% to 2.25%.

It is the first movement in interest rates for eighteen months. The bank cut rates by 0.5% during 2013 but made no changes in 2014.

In a statement, the Governor of the Reserve Bank, Glenn Stevens, said commodity prices have continued to decline and the price of oil has fallen significantly in recent months. Lower energy prices will strengthen global output and lower inflation. However, the bank says growth in Australia “is continuing at a below-trend pace”.

Stevens says the interest rate cut will “is expected to add some further support to demand, so as to foster sustainable growth and inflation outcomes consistent with the target”.

Statement from Glenn Stevens, Governor of the Reserve Bank of Australia.

Statement by Glenn Stevens, Governor: Monetary Policy Decision

At its meeting today, the Board decided to lower the cash rate by 25 basis points to 2.25 per cent, effective 4 February 2015.

Growth in the global economy continued at a moderate pace in 2014. China’s growth was in line with policymakers’ objectives. The US economy continued to strengthen, but the euro area and Japanese economies were both weaker than expected. Forecasts for global growth in 2015 envisage continued moderate growth. [Read more…]


Barack Obama Highlights Climate Change In Speech At University Of Queensland

Ahead of the G20 meeting, President Barack Obama has placed climate change at the centre of a speech to students at the University of Queensland.

Obama

Obama told the gathering that no region had more at stake than the Asia-Pacific. He said climate change was causing more wildfires, flooding, extreme storms and rising seas. “The incredible natural glory of the Great Barrier Reef is threatened,” he said.

Obama pledges $3 billion to the Green Climate Fund to assist developing countries. “Let them leap frog some of the dirty industries that powered our development, go straight to a clean-energy economy that allows them to grow, create jobs and at the same time reduce their carbon pollution,” he said. [Read more…]