Election Funding Payments: 2016 Federal Election

This table shows the election funding payments made to political parties and candidates following the 2016 federal election.

Funding was made in two payments. The first payment was made on July 27. The table below shows the final figure following a second payment made this week.

A candidate or Senate group needs four per cent of the primary vote to be eligible for election funding. The amount is calculated by multiplying the number of votes obtained by the current funding rate.

The funding rate for the 2016 election was 262.784 cents per House of Representatives and Senate vote.

Funding was provided to 24 parties and groups, compared to 12 at the 2013 election. There were 24 independent candidates who received funding, compared to 9 in 2013.

Just over $62.7 million was distributed to parties and candidates. [Read more…]


Seats Changing Hands At The 2016 Federal Election

A total of 19 seats changed hands at the 2016 House of Representatives elections.

The Coalition went into the election holding 90 seats and finished up with 76. It lost 17 (16 to the ALP and one to the Nick Xenophon Team). One seat moved from the Liberal Party to The Nationals. The Liberals won one seat from the ALP.

The ALP went into the election holding 55 seats and ended up with 69. It won 16 from the Coalition, lost one to the Liberals, and lost one to the redistribution in NSW.

As in 2013, there are 5 crossbenchers. The Greens and Katter’s Australian Party retained their seats, whilst the two independents (Wilkie and McGowan) increased their majorities. Clive Palmer did not contest Fairfax and it returned to the LNP. The Nick Xenophon Team took Mayo from the Liberal Party.

The 19 seats that changed hands represent 12.66% of the House. 131 seats (87.33%) did not change hands, demonstrating once again the stability and predictability of Australian voting habits and the narrow range of seats that change governments. In the 2013 election, 22 seats (14.66%) changed hands. [Read more…]


Full List Of United States Senators – 2016

This table shows the full list of United States senators, as of August 2016.

The 50 states have two senators each, for a total of 100. Senators serve 6-year terms, with one-third facing the electorate every two years.

The table below shows the number of senators in each class and their party affiliation. Class 3 was elected in 2010 and faces election this year, on the same day as the presidential election. Class 2 was elected in 2014 and faces election in 2020. Class 1 was elected in 2012 and faces election in 2018.

U.S. Senate Numbers 2016
Class Republicans Democrats Independents TOTAL
Class 1 – Election 2018
8
23
2
33
Class 2 – Election 2020
22
11
33
Class 3 – Election 2016
24
10
34
TOTAL
54
44
2
100

The Republicans currently control the Senate, with 54 members. The Democrats have 44 and there are two independents (including Bernie Sanders) who caucus with them. The Democrats need to win 5 extra seats at this year’s election to win control.

If Hillary Clinton becomes president, the Democrats can take control of the Senate with 4 gains and the casting vote of Vice-President Kaine, in his capacity as President of the Senate. [Read more…]


Tony Abbott Regrets Hyper-Partisanship In Speech To Samuel Griffith Society

Former prime minister Tony Abbott has conceded that the Coalition opposition might have erred in not supporting the Gillard government’s Malaysian solution to the asylum-seeker crisis of 2011.

AbbottDelivering a speech to the Samuel Griffith Society, in Adelaide, said allowing the Malaysian solution “would have been a step back from the hyper-partisanship that now poisons our public life”.

Abbott conceded his government could have handled differently the debate over repealing Section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act.

Abbott also discussed budget repair and his government’s economic policies during 2013-15.

The speech will be seen as another pointer to the role Abbott intends to play in the coming term of parliament.

Speech by Tony Abbott to the Samuel Griffith Society.

My first task tonight is to congratulate the Samuel Griffith Society for its unflinching commitment to upholding our constitution and to safeguarding our legal traditions.

You are, if I may say so, a thoroughly conservative body – not in any partisan sense but in your respect for what has shaped us and in your determination to build on the best features of the past. [Read more…]


Government And ALP Agree On Senate Terms; First Elected To Get 6 Years

It was reported today that the government and the ALP have agreed on the allocation of terms for the new Senate.

The reports say the Coalition and the ALP have agreed that the first six elected in each state will get 6-year terms, whilst the last six will get three-year terms. This is the procedure that has been adopted following previous double dissolutions.

The ALP and the Coalition easily have the numbers to impose this decision on the Senate. Its effect is to give six-year terms to a majority of senators from the Coalition (16 of 28), ALP (13 of 24) and Nick Xenophon Team (2 of 3).

Pauline Hanson and Jacqui Lambie will also get six-year terms. Both polled a Senate quota in their own right.

Only three of the Greens’ nine senators will receive six-year terms. Each of them – Richard Di Natale (Vic), Scott Ludlam (WA) and Peter Whish-Wilson (Tas) – represents a state where the Greens won two places. The other six senators, one in each state, will all face the electorate before June 2019. This means it is all but impossible for the Greens to increase their overall numbers at the next election. Instead, they will face the danger of losing incumbents. [Read more…]


Census Back Online; Contrite ABS Staff Apologise And Say They’re Back On Track

The 2016 Census came back online at 2.30pm this afternoon and the Australian Bureau of Statistics has again apologised for the outage, whilst reassuring the public that the census is back on track.

Kalisch

The Chief Statistician, David Kalisch, and the Census Manager, Duncan Young, both gave televised statements at 5.20pm, in time for the evening news. No resignations were forthcoming. [Read more…]


Shorten On Census: A Failure To Take Responsibility And A Failure Of Leadership

The Opposition Leader, Bill Shorten, says the census has been a shambles and is a failure of responsibility and leadership on the part of the Turnbull government.

Shorten

Speaking in Melbourne, Shorten said the census has been one of the “biggest shambles” of government in many years. “Turnbull is already talking about blaming someone else,” he said. The government’s “failure to take responsibility is a failure of leadership”.

Shorten called for an independent Senate inquiry. “The only thing you can be sure of is that the heads that won’t roll are the ones sitting at the Cabinet table,” he said. [Read more…]