The Balance of Power in the Senate

The Federal election has made little change to the composition of the Senate. However, some interesting possibilities exist in the next six months before the new senators take up their places.

Senate
State of the Parties
Party Now July 1
2002
ALP
28
28
Liberal/CLP
32
32
National
3
3
Democrats
9
8
Greens
1
2
Harradine
1
1
One Nation
1
1
Independent
1
1
Total

76

76

There are 12 senators per State, regardless of the size (population or geographic) of the State. The Australian Capital Territory and Northern Territory have 2 senators each.

Senators are elected for fixed six-year terms. Terms commence on July 1 and run until June 30 six years later. Half of the Senate face the people every three years, although ACT and NT senators serve the same term as members of the House of Representatives.

Senators elected at the elections on October 3, 1998 took up their places on July 1, 1999. They expire on June 30, 2005.

Senators chosen on November 10, 2001 take up their places on July 1, 2002. Until then, senators elected on March 2, 1996 (who took up their places on July 1, 1996) will remain in place until June 30, 2002.

Of course, many Senators were re-elected, so little will change next year. Senators who were defeated on November 10, such as Vicki Bourne (Democrats, NSW) or Chris Schacht (ALP, South Australia) know that they have a job until midnight on June 30, 2002. [Read more…]


Current and Prospective Senate Membership

Following the 2001 federal election, the composition of the Senate is now clear.

In addition to the 150 members of the House of Representatives chosen on November 10, there were also 40 senators elected. Thirty-six of these, six from each State, will begin their terms on July 1, 2002.

The 4 senators from the Northern Territory and ACT take up their positions immediately. Unlike other senators who serve a 6-year term, territory senators serve the same term as the House of Representatives.

The net effect of this year’s election is that the Democrats have lost one seat and the Greens have gained one. The Coalition parties will continue to have 35 members and the ALP 28.

Current and Prospective Senate Membership
Senators elected in 1998; terms began July 1 1999; terms expire June 30, 2005
Senators elected in 1996; terms began July 1, 1996; terms expire June 30, 2002
Senators elected in 2001; terms begin July 1, 2002; terms expire June 30, 2008
Senator
Party
Senator
Party
Senator
Party
New South Wales
Steve Hutchins ALP Marise Payne
(replaced Bob Woods 6.5.97)
Lib Helen Coonan Lib
Bill Heffernan Lib Sue West ALP Ursula Stephens ALP
John Faulkner ALP Sandy Macdonald (replaced David Brownhill 9.5.00) NP Sandy Macdonald NP
John Tierney Lib George Campbell
(replaced Bruce Childs 22.9.97)
ALP George Campbell ALP
Aden Ridgeway Dem Helen Coonan Lib Marise Payne Lib
Michael Forshaw ALP Vicki Bourne Dem Kerry Nettle Greens
Victoria
Stephen Conroy ALP Richard Alston Lib Richard Alston Lib
Judith Troeth Lib Robert Ray ALP Robert Ray ALP
Kim Carr ALP Rod Kemp Lib Rod Kemp Lib
Julian McGauran NP Barney Cooney ALP Gavin Marshall ALP
Jacinta Collins ALP Kay Patterson Lib Kay Patterson Lib
Tsebin Tchen Lib Lyn Allison Dem Lyn Allison Dem
Queensland
Jan McLucas ALP Ian Macdonald Lib Ian Macdonald Lib
George Brandis (replaced Warwick Parer 5.6.00) Lib John Hogg ALP John Hogg ALP
Len Harris
(replaced Heather Hill 2.7.99)
ONP Ron Boswell NP John Herron Lib
Joe Ludwig ALP John Herron Lib Claire Moore ALP
Brett Mason Lib Brenda Gibbs ALP Andrew Bartlett Dem
John Cherry (replaced John Woodley 6.8.2001) Dem Andrew Bartlett
(replaced Cheryl Kernot 30.10.97)
Dem Ron Boswell NP
Western Australia
Chris Ellison Lib Winston Crane Lib Alan Eggleston Lib
Peter Cook ALP Jim McKiernan ALP Mark Bishop ALP
Ian Campbell Lib Ross Lightfoot
(replaced John Panizza 26.5.97)
Lib David Johnston Lib
Chris Evans ALP Mark Bishop ALP Ruth Webber ALP
Brian Greig Dem Alan Eggleston Lib Ross Lightfoot Lib
Sue Knowles Lib Andrew Murray Dem Andrew Murray Dem
South Australia
Amanda Vanstone Lib Robert Hill Lib Robert Hill Lib
Nick Bolkus ALP Rosemary Crowley ALP Penny Wong ALP
Nick Minchin Lib Natasha Stott Despoja Dem Jeannie Ferris Lib
Geoffrey Buckland (replaced John Quirke 3.10.00) ALP Grant Chapman Lib Linda Kirk ALP
Meg Lees Dem Chris Schacht ALP Grant Chapman Lib
Alan Ferguson Lib Jeannie Ferris
(resigned 12.7.96, reappointed 20.8.96)
Lib Natasha Stott Despoja Dem
Tasmania
Kerry O’Brien ALP Jocelyn Newman Lib Paul Calvert Lib
Eric Abetz Lib Sue Mackay ALP Sue Mackay ALP
Shayne Murphy ALP Paul Calvert Lib John Watson Lib
Brian Gibson Lib Nick Sherry ALP Nick Sherry ALP
Kay Denman ALP John Watson Lib Bob Brown Greens
Brian Harradine Ind Bob Brown Greens R. Colbeck Lib
Northern Territory (terms equal that of House)
Trish Crossin ALP Trish Crossin ALP
Grant Tambling CLP Nigel Scullion CLP
Australian Capital Territory (terms equal that of House)
Kate Lundy ALP Kate Lundy ALP
Margaret Reid Lib Margaret Reid Lib

 

Senate
State of the Parties
Party Now July 1
2002
ALP
28
28
Liberal/CLP
32
32
National
3
3
Democrats
9
8
Greens
1
2
Harradine
1
1
One Nation
1
1
Independent
1
1
Total

76

76

 


Howard Sworn In For Third Term As Prime Minister

Prime Minister John Howard has been officially sworn in for his third term as Prime Minister, following the federal election.

Peter Costello has also taken the oath as Treasurer.

  • Listen to the swearing-in

ALP National Secretary Geoff Walsh Discusses Labor’s Election Defeat

The morning after the ALP’s federal election defeat in 2001, its National Secretary, Geoff Walsh, was interviewed on Channel 7′ Sunrise program.

Walsh argued that the ALP had done well to claw back the scale of its defeat.

The election resulted in Prime Minister John Howard winning his third successive election.

Opposition Leader Kim Beazley stood down after the election defeat. Although he returned to the leadership in 2005, he never again contested an election as leader.

  • Watch Walsh on Sunrise (10m)



ALP 2001 Federal Election Policies

This page contains links to PDF documents of a selection of ALP policies for the 2001 federal election.


Kim Beazley’s 2001 Federal Election Policy Speech

The Leader of the Opposition, Kim Beazley, delivered his 2001 Federal Election policy speech at the Hurstville Entertainment Centre in Sydney on October 31.

“I want the job,” Beazley told his audience, claiming that he was committed, qualified and “here for the long haul”.

  • Listen to Beazley’s speech (37m)
  • Watch Beazley:

Text of Kim Beazley’s 2001 election policy speech.

Men and women of Australia:

Today I offer myself as Prime Minister of this great country.

I want the job — I’m committed, I’m qualified, and I’m here for the long haul.

I have a plan to deliver a fair share, and a secure future, for all Australians.

I stand for the best possible education for all, not just the rich.

I stand for a health system where your Medicare Card is more important than your credit card.

I will put the care back into aged care.

I stand for making the GST simpler and fairer, for relieving the burden on small business, and on families. [Read more…]


Beazley Pledges GST Rollback

The Federal Opposition Leader, Kim Beazley, has unveiled the ALP’s GST “rollback” plans, pledging to remove the 10% tax from electricity and gas from 2003.

The GST would also be taken off caravan park residents, women’s sanitary products, funerals, nappies and textbooks. The ALP has also promised to remove the impact of the tax from the emergency relief services of charities.

Beazley says the rollback will cost $2.2 billion over 4 years, but would not put the budget into deficit. [Read more…]