2017 U.K. Election Results – Detailed

The booklet shown below contains detailed information on the results of the 2017 United Kingdom elections.

The Conservative Party lost a net 13 seats to finish with 317 seats in the House of Commons. The Labour Party had a net gain of 30 seats to finish with 262. The Scottish National Party won 35 seats, a lost of 21. The Liberal Democrats won 12, an increase of 4.

Having lost its majority, Prime Minister Theresa May’s government now survives with the support of the Irish Democratic Unionist Party, which won 10 seats, an increase of 2. [Read more…]


Cameron And Miliband Respond To Leveson

UK Prime Minister David Cameron and Opposition Leader Ed Miliband have spoken in the House of Commons in response to the Leveson inquiry report.

Cameron accepted the principles of the Leveson report but rejected the need for a statute, whereas Milband called for Leveson’s proposals to be accepted “in their entirety”. [Read more…]


British Reforms To Parliament’s Sitting Times

Sitting times for Britain’s House of Commons will change from early next year.

This article is extracted from The Backbencher email newsletter published by The Guardian.

The Guardian’s political editor, Michael White, hopes he is wrong to be sceptical about the reforms to parliament’s working hours.

Today was the last prime minister’s question time to be held at 3 o’clock. It’s difficult to remember now, but five or six years ago prime ministers used to arrive on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 3.15pm for two sessions a week – two different accountabilities, as opposition and backbench MPs might put it. Tony Blair unilaterally changed it to one session of 30 minutes: the same amount of time but only one period of accountability. It annoyed quite a lot of people, but we have got used to it. [Read more…]


Parliamentary Procedures: Unparliamentary Language

One of the more confusing aspects of parliamentary procedure is knowing what constitutes unparliamentary language.

This article is taken from The Backbencher, the weekly newsletter from The Guardian.

Unparliamentary Language

It’s alarmingly easy for new MPs to slip up in the early days of a parliament. MPs are not allowed to accuse each other of lying or inebriation – a rule once flouted by Clare Short during a drunken speech by the late employment minister, Alan Clark – and the Speaker has also objected to various terms of abuse, including “blackguard”, “git”, “rat”, “traitor” and “stoolpigeon”. [Read more…]


Parliamentary Procedure: Seated And Covered

This British article explains the arcane practice of members of parliament remaining seated and covered in the chamber.

The article is taken from The Backbencher, the weekly newsletter from The Guardian.

Seated and Covered

House of Commons rules used to demand that an MP who wanted to make a point of order during a division was “seated and covered”. This indicated that they were not trying to start a debate, which is forbidden at this time. [Read more…]


Longest Serving Members Of UK Parliament – 2001

The following list shows all people who have been Members of Parliament in the 20th century and have served in Parliament for more than 40 years.

In reckoning the time the date of leaving Parliament has been assumed to be the polling day of the general election at which they retired, rather than the date of dissolution of their last Parliament. If a year is listed without a date, then this is a reference to the general election of that year. [Read more…]


UK By-Elections – 1997-99

This is a research paper on UK by-elections held since the 1997 General Election.

The paper was produced by the research section of the House of Commons Library. [Read more…]