Senator Lin Thorp (ALP-Tas) – Valedictory Speech

Lin Thorp was a Tasmanian ALP senator for two years from June 2012.

Thorp

She was appointed to fill a casual vacancy created by the retirement of Senator Nick Sherry. She failed to win re-election at the 2013 federal election. Her position was effectively taken by the Palmer United Party’s Jacqui Lambie. [Read more…]


Sherry Resigns From Senate

Senator Nick Sherry’s resignation took effect today, creating a casual vacancy in Tasmania.

Sherry retired from the Gillard ministry last December. He has been a Labor senator since 1990.

Under Section 15 of the Constitution, the Tasmanian parliament will appoint a replacement to the casual vacancy. It is obliged to appoint a member of the same party. The Tasmanian ALP will pre-select the new member.

Tasmanian Greens Senator Bob Brown is also expected to resign from the Senate in the next few weeks. His replacement will be Peter Whish-Wilson.


Valedictory Speech: Senator Nick Sherry

After a 22-year parliamentary career, Tasmanian Labor Senator Nick Sherry has announced his retirement.

Nick SherrySherry was first elected in 1990. He was re-elected in 1996, 2001 and 2007.

When the Rudd government was elected in 2007, he became Minister for Superannuation and Corporate Law. In 2009, he was appointed Assistant Treasurer.

After the formation of the minority Labor government in September 2010, he became Minister for Small Business, Minister Assisting the Minister for Tourism and Minister Assisting on Deregulation and Public Sector Superannuation. [Read more…]


Senator Nick Sherry Announces Retirement From Gillard Ministry

Senator Nick Sherry, the Small Business Minister, has confirmed his retirement from the Gillard ministry.

Senator Nick Sherry (ALP-Tas)

Speaking at a press conference in Canberra, Sherry said he was retiring from the ministry and would remain in the Senate, but he will not contest the next election. [Read more…]


3-2-1 Split In Tasmanian Senate Poll

The AEC has declared the Senate result in Tasmania. The ALP has won 3 places, the Liberals 2 and the Greens 1.

AEC State Manager for Tasmania, Marie Neilson, said that the Senate count had involved the keying of votes into a computerised system, and today an automated process was used to distribute preferences and determine the six elected candidates. “As with all aspects of the count, the final process undertaken today was able to be observed by scrutineers representing candidates.”

The successful candidates for the 6 Tasmanian Senate vacancies, in order of their election are:

  1. Nick Sherry (ALP)
  2. Richard Colbeck (Lib)
  3. Bob Brown (Greens)
  4. Carol Brown (ALP)
  5. David Bushby (Lib)
  6. Catryna Bilyk (ALP)

Senator Nick Sherry (ALP-Tas) – Maiden Speech

This is the maiden speech by Tasmanian Labor Senator Nick Sherry.

Hansard transcript of Senator Nick Sherry’s maiden speech.
Nick SherrySenator SHERRY (3.37) —Mr Deputy President, I extend my congratulations on your election to the position of Deputy President of the Senate; also, my congratulations to Senator Sibraa on his election to the position of President. I also offer my congratulations on the maiden speech of Senator Herron. I am not sure what it feels like to be the first person to give a maiden speech but I certainly know what it feels like to be the last.

It is with a great mixture of humility and pride that I give my first speech here today in the Senate. In particular, it is a great moment for me to be representing my State, Tasmania, and also for me to be representing my Party, the Australian Labor Party, yet again in government.

The State of Tasmania was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman. He called the island Van Diemen’s Land. Then he sailed away and it was largely forgotten. The next to visit Van Diemen’s Land were the French explorers who left little but names again, such as D’Entrecasteaux and Freycinet. Van Diemen’s Land was also on the visiting list of the Americans and the Russians, but they were beaten by the English, who, recognising Tasmania’s geographical isolation, realised the possibilities of a penal colony to end all penal colonies. Over the next 50 years of first settlement, approximately 40 per cent of all the convicts that were sent to Australia were sent to Tasmania. In touching on the theme of Tasmania’s geographical isolation, I would like to acknowledge and thank the Hawke Labor Government for continuing to recognise the difficulties that the isolation has caused for our State by ensuring that the freight equalisation scheme was retained in full and unchanged in the recent Budget. [Read more…]