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Archives for November 1998

President Clinton’s Answers to Judiciary Committee’s 81 Questions

This is the full text of President Clinton’s Answers to the Judiciary Committee’s 81 Questions.

Response from President Clinton to the House Judiciary Committee’s 81 questions.

Set forth below are the answers to the questions that you have asked me.

I would like to repeat, at the outset, something that I have said before about my approach to these proceedings. I have asked my attorneys to participate actively, but the fact that there is a legal defense to the various allegations cannot obscure the hard truth, as I have said repeatedly, that my conduct was wrong. It was also wrong to mislead people about what happened and I deeply regret that. [Read more…]


Election Funding Payments: 1998 Federal Election

This table shows the election funding payments made to political parties and candidates following the 1998 federal election.

A candidate or Senate group needs four per cent of the primary vote to be eligible for election funding. The amount is calculated by multiplying the number of votes obtained by the current funding rate.

The funding rate for the 1998 election was 162.210 cents per House of Representatives and Senate vote.

A total of $33.8 million was distributed to parties and candidates. [Read more…]


Statistics On Legislation Passed By Federal Parliament 1993-98

Statistics from the five years 1993-98 show a consistent pattern of legislation by the Federal Parliament.

In four of the five years, the parliament passed between 168 and 198 pieces of legislation. The figure dropped to 113 in the period covering the 1996 election and the change of government.

The process of legislating, making laws, is the most basic day-to-day function of the parliament.

According to Section 1 of the Constitution, all laws must be approved by the House of Representatives and the Senate. Section 58 requires that they are then submitted to the Governor-General for royal assent.

These figures have been compiled by the Parliamentary Library:

Bills Passed By Both Houses of Parliament
Year No. Bills
1993-94
198
1994-95
168
1995-96
113
1996-97
172
1997-98
183

 


Bob Collins: Statehood, Reconciliation and Good Health

This Menzies School of Health Research Oration speech was given by Bob Collins, former ALP Senator for the Northern Territory.

Speech by Bob Collins to the Menzies School of Health Research.

On Oct. 3 this year a clear majority of Territorians did what many thought impossible – they voted NO to statehood. Commentators said it was like losing a vote on motherhood with support for the YES vote running at 70% – 80% in the main urban centres of the Territory.

I strongly question the basis of those assumptions. Support for statehood among many Territorians who think their lifestyle couldn’t be any better has never been that high. It is easy to get a 70% – 80% YES response to the simple question ‘Should the NT become a state?’. When it comes to more detailed consideration that level of support rapidly erodes. A vote of between 50% – 60% overall was a more likely result. I am certain that if the questions on statehood and the constitution had been put separately and the debate had been inclusive of concerns on process and the draft constitution this would have been achieved. Why wasn’t it? [Read more…]


1998 Primary Vote Winners, Preference Vote Losers

There were seven seats in the 1998 Federal election where the primary vote leader was defeated after the full distribution of preferences.

Primary Leads Overturned After Preference Distribution
House of Representatives – 1998
No. State Division Incumbent Leader Primary % Successful Candidate Primary % Two-Party %
1.
NSW Parkes Michael Cobb (NP) Barry Brebner (ALP)
35.59
Tony Lawler (NP)
28.38
54.11
2.
VIC McMillan Russell Broadbent (LP) Russell Broadbent (LP)
38.91
Christian Zahra (ALP)
36.91
50.57
3.
QLD Blair new seat Pauline Hanson (ONP)
35.97
Cameron Thompson (LP)
21.69
53.40
4.
QLD Hinkler Paul Neville (NP) Cheryl Dorron (ALP)
40.11
Paul Neville (NP)
36.58
50.34
5.
WA Stirling Eoin Cameron (LP) Eoin Cameron (LP)
41.71
Jann McFarlane (ALP)
40.38
51.04
6.
SA Kingston Susan Jeanes (LP) Susan Jeanes (LP)
39.45
David Cox (ALP)
38.51
50.47
7.
TAS Bass Warwick Smith (LP) Warwick Smith (LP)
45.75
Michelle O’Byrne (ALP)
42.30
50.06

These statistics show the full force of the preferential voting system. Both Tony Lawler and Cameron Thompson were able to win their seats, despite polling only 28% and 21% of the primary vote. [Read more…]


Sam Dash’s Letter Of Resignation

This is the text of Sam Dash’s resignation letter to the Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr.

In the 1970s, Dash had been Chief Counsel for the Senate Watergate Committee.

Dash resigned over Starr’s appearance before the House Judiciary Committee, describing him as an “aggressive advocate”.

Text of Sam Dash’s letter of resignation to Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr.

Dear Ken,

I hereby submit my resignation as outside consultant and adviser to you and your Office of Independent Counsel, effective at noon today. [Read more…]


Kenneth Starr’s Testimony Before The House Judiciary Committee – 7/7

This is the seventh of seven pages with the full text of Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr’s testimony before the House Judiciary Committee.

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7

Kenneth Starr testimony before the House Judiciary Committee.

Transcript of House Judiciary Committee Hearing Following Starr’s Testimony.

HYDE: Everybody stay, please. The committee will stay. Maxine, don’t go.

(APPLAUSE)

HYDE: We’re going to have a meeting.

(APPLAUSE)

HYDE: Ladies and gentlemen, the committee hearing stands adjourned, but the committee will remain here for a very short meeting. [Read more…]


Kenneth Starr’s Testimony Before The House Judiciary Committee – 6/7

This is the sixth of seven pages with the full text of Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr’s testimony before the House Judiciary Committee.

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7

Kenneth Starr testimony before the House Judiciary Committee.

House Majority Counsel’s Examination of Kenneth Starr Before the House Judiciary Committee.

HYDE: Mr. Starr, do you want a little break?

STARR: No, Mr. Chairman.

HYDE: OK, we’re at the final…

STARR: We’re almost at my bedtime.

HYDE: We’re past mine, I can assure you. The gentlelady from California. [Read more…]


Kenneth Starr’s Testimony Before The House Judiciary Committee – 5/7

This is the fifth of seven pages with the full text of Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr’s testimony before the House Judiciary Committee.

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7

Kenneth Starr testimony before the House Judiciary Committee.

President Clinton’s Attorney David Kendall’s Cross Examination of Kenneth Starr Before the House Judiciary Committee.

HYDE: The committee will come to order.

The chair now recognizes the president’s counsel, Mr. Kendall, to examine the witness for 30 minutes, should he choose to do so. [Read more…]


Kenneth Starr’s Testimony Before The House Judiciary Committee – 4/7

This is the fourth of seven pages with the full text of Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr’s testimony before the House Judiciary Committee.

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7

Kenneth Starr testimony before the House Judiciary Committee.

House Minority Counsel’s Examination of Kenneth Starr Before the House Judiciary Committee.

HYDE: The committee will come to order. I would appreciate it if we could get the doors closed.

The chair now recognizes minority counsel, Mr. Lowell, to question the witness for 30 minutes.

LOWELL: Thank you, Mr. Chairman. [Read more…]