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Archives for 2001

Toowoomba Preparatory School: Statement By Governor-General Peter Hollingworth

The following statement has been released by the Governor-General, Dr. Peter Hollingworth.

Statement by the Governor-General, Dr. Peter Hollingworth.

The Governor-General, Dr Hollingworth, has taken note of the suggestion of the Premier of Queensland that he might spend some time with the victims of child abuse in Brisbane. He appreciates Mr Beattie’s suggestion, which anticipated his own thinking on the matter. [Read more…]


Howard Defends Hollingworth

The Prime Minister, John Howard, has defended the Governor-General, former Archbishop Peter Hollingworth, against calls for his resignation over his behaviour concerning sexual abuse claims at a Queensland school in 1990.

Critics of the Governor-General have argued this week that he failed to take prompt and appropriate action over abuse claims at the Toowoomba Preparatory School. Hollingworth has been accused of insensitivity, undue reliance on legal advice about the church’s insurance policies, and general indifference to the issue.

Speaking on ABC radio today with Clive Robertson, Howard argued that everyone has their critics: “I feel for him over that but I’ve always found him to be a very committed genuine conscientious person.” [Read more…]


Toowoomba Preparatory School: Statement by Governor-General Peter Hollingworth

The Governor-General, Dr. Peter Hollingworth, has denied being involved in a cover-up of allegations of sexual abuse at the Toowoomba Preparatory School in 1990, when he was the Anglican Archbishop of Brisbane.

In a statement released today, Dr. Hollingworth says he had only an ex-officio role on the school council: “Naturally then, I had no involvement whatsoever in the normal conduct of the affairs of the School.” [Read more…]


2001 Primary Vote Winners, Preference Vote Losers

There were 6 seats in the 2001 federal election where the primary vote leader was defeated after the full distribution of preferences.

Primary Leads Overturned After Preference Distribution
House of Representatives – 2001
No. State Division Incumbent Leader Primary % Successful Candidate Primary % Two-Party %
1
NSW Cowper Gary Nehl (NP) Jenny Bonfield (ALP)
32.31
Luke Hartsuyker (NP)
29.89
54.73
2
NSW Paterson Bob Horne (ALP) Bob Horne (ALP)
40.75
Bob Baldwin (LP)
39.91
51.42
3
VIC Chisholm Anna Burke (ALP) Ros Clowes (LP)
43.58
Anna Burke (ALP)
42.44
52.77
4
VIC Melbourne Ports Michael Danby (ALP) Andrew McLorinan (LP)
39.71
Michael Danby (ALP)
39.36
55.69
5
QLD Brisbane Arch Bevis (ALP) Seb Monsour (LP)
39.32
Arch Bevis (ALP)
38.23
53.13
6
WA Hasluck new seat Bethwyn Chan (LP)
39.33
Sharryn Jackson (ALP)
38.23
51.78

These statistics show the full force of the preferential voting system. Luke Hartsuyker won Cowper, despite polling only 29.89% of the primary vote, because he gained the majority of second preferences from the Liberal candidate. The Liberal candidate polled 15.95%.

Overall, there were 87 electorates (58%) where preference distribution was required to obtain a winner in 2001.

These 6 electorates where the primary vote lead was overturned after preferences indicates that a primary vote lead is the best position to be in to be sure of success. It is apparent that whilst a party or parties can win seats and elections on preferences, there is no substitute for being ahead in the primary vote.

Some people argue that these statistics demonstrate that we may as well introduce first-past-the-post voting, since most candidates who lead on the primary vote ultimately triumph. This argument fails to take account of the possibility that electors may cast different votes if they knew that their preferences did not matter.



Brief History of the Howard Government – 1998-2001

The Howard Government was first elected on March 2, 1996.

HowardIt was the first federal victory by the coalition of the Liberal and National Parties since 1980.

The government was re-elected on October 3, 1998, this time with a vastly reduced majority.

The government’s first term was characterised by tight budgeting, the partial privatisation of Telstra, industrial relations changes, persistent problems with ministerial behaviour and the Wik debate. [Read more…]


Bill Clinton: The Struggle for the Soul of the 21st Century

This is the text of The Richard Dimbleby Lecture 2001, given by the former United States President, Bill Clinton.

  • Listen to the introduction (3m)
  • Listen to Clinton (46m)

Text of The Richard Dimbleby Lecture by former President Bill Clinton.

Bill ClintonI’m delighted to be here, delighted to be part of this distinguished lecture series at a time when every American is especially grateful for our long friendship with the United Kingdom; one that we see manifest now in the partnership that President Bush and Tony Blair have demonstrated in the fight against Afghanistan; one that touched every American heart when the Queen instructed her band to play the American national anthem in the grounds of Buckingham Palace the day after September 11th. One that I came to appreciate deeply when we worked together for peace for Northern Ireland and the Balkans.

Lord Keynes once said how difficult it is for nations to understand one another, even when they had the advantage of a common language; “everyone talks about international co-operation, but how little of pride, of temper, or of habit.” [Read more…]


Howard Government 2001 Cabinet Committees

The Prime Minister, John Howard, has announced the composition of Cabinet Committees for his third term government.

Text of media release by Prime Minister John Howard.

Cabinet Committees play an important role in the effectiveness of the Cabinet system, and this role will be enhanced in the Government’s third term by the creation of new committees for Policy and Priorities and for Sustainable Environment.

These new committees will join those covering National Security, Employment and Infrastructure, Expenditure Review and Parliamentary Business. [Read more…]


The Balance of Power in the Senate

The Federal election has made little change to the composition of the Senate. However, some interesting possibilities exist in the next six months before the new senators take up their places.

Senate
State of the Parties
Party Now July 1
2002
ALP
28
28
Liberal/CLP
32
32
National
3
3
Democrats
9
8
Greens
1
2
Harradine
1
1
One Nation
1
1
Independent
1
1
Total

76

76

There are 12 senators per State, regardless of the size (population or geographic) of the State. The Australian Capital Territory and Northern Territory have 2 senators each.

Senators are elected for fixed six-year terms. Terms commence on July 1 and run until June 30 six years later. Half of the Senate face the people every three years, although ACT and NT senators serve the same term as members of the House of Representatives.

Senators elected at the elections on October 3, 1998 took up their places on July 1, 1999. They expire on June 30, 2005.

Senators chosen on November 10, 2001 take up their places on July 1, 2002. Until then, senators elected on March 2, 1996 (who took up their places on July 1, 1996) will remain in place until June 30, 2002.

Of course, many Senators were re-elected, so little will change next year. Senators who were defeated on November 10, such as Vicki Bourne (Democrats, NSW) or Chris Schacht (ALP, South Australia) know that they have a job until midnight on June 30, 2002. [Read more…]


Current and Prospective Senate Membership

Following the 2001 federal election, the composition of the Senate is now clear.

In addition to the 150 members of the House of Representatives chosen on November 10, there were also 40 senators elected. Thirty-six of these, six from each State, will begin their terms on July 1, 2002.

The 4 senators from the Northern Territory and ACT take up their positions immediately. Unlike other senators who serve a 6-year term, territory senators serve the same term as the House of Representatives.

The net effect of this year’s election is that the Democrats have lost one seat and the Greens have gained one. The Coalition parties will continue to have 35 members and the ALP 28.

Current and Prospective Senate Membership
Senators elected in 1998; terms began July 1 1999; terms expire June 30, 2005
Senators elected in 1996; terms began July 1, 1996; terms expire June 30, 2002
Senators elected in 2001; terms begin July 1, 2002; terms expire June 30, 2008
Senator
Party
Senator
Party
Senator
Party
New South Wales
Steve Hutchins ALP Marise Payne
(replaced Bob Woods 6.5.97)
Lib Helen Coonan Lib
Bill Heffernan Lib Sue West ALP Ursula Stephens ALP
John Faulkner ALP Sandy Macdonald (replaced David Brownhill 9.5.00) NP Sandy Macdonald NP
John Tierney Lib George Campbell
(replaced Bruce Childs 22.9.97)
ALP George Campbell ALP
Aden Ridgeway Dem Helen Coonan Lib Marise Payne Lib
Michael Forshaw ALP Vicki Bourne Dem Kerry Nettle Greens
Victoria
Stephen Conroy ALP Richard Alston Lib Richard Alston Lib
Judith Troeth Lib Robert Ray ALP Robert Ray ALP
Kim Carr ALP Rod Kemp Lib Rod Kemp Lib
Julian McGauran NP Barney Cooney ALP Gavin Marshall ALP
Jacinta Collins ALP Kay Patterson Lib Kay Patterson Lib
Tsebin Tchen Lib Lyn Allison Dem Lyn Allison Dem
Queensland
Jan McLucas ALP Ian Macdonald Lib Ian Macdonald Lib
George Brandis (replaced Warwick Parer 5.6.00) Lib John Hogg ALP John Hogg ALP
Len Harris
(replaced Heather Hill 2.7.99)
ONP Ron Boswell NP John Herron Lib
Joe Ludwig ALP John Herron Lib Claire Moore ALP
Brett Mason Lib Brenda Gibbs ALP Andrew Bartlett Dem
John Cherry (replaced John Woodley 6.8.2001) Dem Andrew Bartlett
(replaced Cheryl Kernot 30.10.97)
Dem Ron Boswell NP
Western Australia
Chris Ellison Lib Winston Crane Lib Alan Eggleston Lib
Peter Cook ALP Jim McKiernan ALP Mark Bishop ALP
Ian Campbell Lib Ross Lightfoot
(replaced John Panizza 26.5.97)
Lib David Johnston Lib
Chris Evans ALP Mark Bishop ALP Ruth Webber ALP
Brian Greig Dem Alan Eggleston Lib Ross Lightfoot Lib
Sue Knowles Lib Andrew Murray Dem Andrew Murray Dem
South Australia
Amanda Vanstone Lib Robert Hill Lib Robert Hill Lib
Nick Bolkus ALP Rosemary Crowley ALP Penny Wong ALP
Nick Minchin Lib Natasha Stott Despoja Dem Jeannie Ferris Lib
Geoffrey Buckland (replaced John Quirke 3.10.00) ALP Grant Chapman Lib Linda Kirk ALP
Meg Lees Dem Chris Schacht ALP Grant Chapman Lib
Alan Ferguson Lib Jeannie Ferris
(resigned 12.7.96, reappointed 20.8.96)
Lib Natasha Stott Despoja Dem
Tasmania
Kerry O’Brien ALP Jocelyn Newman Lib Paul Calvert Lib
Eric Abetz Lib Sue Mackay ALP Sue Mackay ALP
Shayne Murphy ALP Paul Calvert Lib John Watson Lib
Brian Gibson Lib Nick Sherry ALP Nick Sherry ALP
Kay Denman ALP John Watson Lib Bob Brown Greens
Brian Harradine Ind Bob Brown Greens R. Colbeck Lib
Northern Territory (terms equal that of House)
Trish Crossin ALP Trish Crossin ALP
Grant Tambling CLP Nigel Scullion CLP
Australian Capital Territory (terms equal that of House)
Kate Lundy ALP Kate Lundy ALP
Margaret Reid Lib Margaret Reid Lib

 

Senate
State of the Parties
Party Now July 1
2002
ALP
28
28
Liberal/CLP
32
32
National
3
3
Democrats
9
8
Greens
1
2
Harradine
1
1
One Nation
1
1
Independent
1
1
Total

76

76

 


Election Funding Payments: 2001 Federal Election

This table shows the election funding payments made to political parties and candidates following the 2001 federal election.

A candidate or Senate group needs four per cent of the primary vote to be eligible for election funding. The amount is calculated by multiplying the number of votes obtained by the current funding rate.

The funding rate for the 2001 election was 179.026 cents per House of Representatives and Senate vote.

A total of nearly $35.7 million was distributed to parties and candidates. [Read more…]