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Political Quotations – Set 4

  1. The greatest of faults, I should say, is to be conscious of none. – Thomas Carlyle, writer (1795-1881)
  2. Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great. – Mark Twain (1835-1910)
  3. It is impossible to defeat an ignorant man in argument. – William G. McAdoo, American government official (1863-1941)
  4. An elder Cherokee Native American was teaching his grandchildren about life. He said to them, “A fight is going on inside me…It is a terrible fight, and it is between two wolves. One wolf represents fear, anger, envy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, pride and superiority. The other wolf stands for joy, peace, love, hope, sharing, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, friendship, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion, and faith. This same fight is going on inside of you and every other person too.” They thought about it for a minute and then one child asked his grandfather, “Which wolf will win?” The old Cherokee simply replied…”The one I feed.”
  5. If you hate a person, you hate something in him that is part of yourself. What isn’t part of ourselves doesn’t disturb us. – Herman Hesse, German novelist (1877-1962)
  6. I love my country too much to be a nationalist. – Albert Camus, writer, philosopher, Nobel laureate (1913-1960)
  7. The mind is but a barren soil; a soil which is soon exhausted, and will produce no crop, or only one, unless it be continually fertilized and enriched with foreign matter. – Joshua Reynolds, painter (1723-1792)
  8. What you do is of little significance; but it is very important that you do it. – Mohandas K. Gandhi (1869-1948)
  9. Man is born to live, not to prepare for life. – Boris Pasternak, Russian author (1890-1960)
  10. The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts. – Bertrand Russell, philosopher, mathematician, author, Nobel laureate (1872-1970)
  11. I know nothing grander, better exercise, better digestion, more positive proof of the past, the triumphant result of faith in human kind, than a well-contested American national election. – Walt Whitman, American poet (1819-1892)
  12. An old error is always more popular than a new truth. – German proverb
  13. Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only to be understood. – Marie Curie, Polish Nobel Prize-winning chemist (1867-1934)
  14. It is only those who have neither fired a shot nor heard the shrieks and groans of the wounded who cry aloud for blood, more vengeance, more desolation. War is hell. – William Tecumseh Sherman, Union General in the American Civil War (1820-1891)
  15. A person usually has two reasons for doing something: a good reason and the real reason. – Thomas Carlyle, historian and essayist (1795-1881)
  16. Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly strong, have governed my life: the longing for love, the search for knowledge and unbearable pity for the suffering of mankind. – Bertrand Russell, English philosopher (1872-1970)
  17. Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge. – Charles Darwin, naturalist and author (1809-1882)
  18. All generalizations are dangerous, even this one. – attributed to Alexandre Dumas, French author (1824-1895)
  19. Heresy is another word for freedom of thought. – Graham Greene, English writer (1904-1991)
  20. Nothing makes people so worthy of compliments as occasionally receiving them. One is more delightful for being told one is delightful – just as one is more angry for being told one is angry. – Katharine Fullerton Gerould, American writer (1879-1944)

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