Who’s Left – The Surviving Members Of Every House Of Representatives Since 1949

Detailed information on the surviving members of the House of Representatives since 1949 is now available on this site. They include the members’ seats, parties, terms, dates of birth, ages and deaths.

All members of parliament who served in the first 18 parliaments from 1901 until the end of 1949 are now deceased.

There are two surviving members of the 19th Parliament that was elected on December 10, 1949. Both “forty-niners” are in their late 90s. One, Henry Pearce, will turn 100 in September this year.

Just four members of the House during the 1950s are still living.

For the entire Menzies era (1949-1972), there are 29 surviving members. All but four of them served together in the 27th Parliament between 1969 and 1972.

The table below provides a summary of how many members have served in the 19th to 45th parliaments. It shows how many are still living and what parties they belong to. There are links to more detailed information on each parliament since 1972.

Note: The data is structured around the parliaments since 1949. The numbers cannot be aggregated. Most surviving members served in more than one parliament.

Disclaimer: I am confident that the data shown here is correct. However, I rely on media reports and announcements in parliament for information on deaths of former members. I sincerely hope I haven’t killed or resurrected anyone. I am happy to receive corrections from readers.

House of Representatives – Members Still Living Since 1949
(Listed by Parliament No. and Years)
No. Years Size Members
Still
Living
% Oldest Surviving
Member
ALP Lib CP/
Nat
Oth
19th
1949-1951
121
2
1.65
Henry Pearce (99)
2
20th
1951-1954
131
2
1.52
Henry Pearce (99)
2
21st
1954-1955
122
1
0.81
Henry Pearce (99)
1
22nd
1955-1958
127
3
2.36
Henry Pearce (99)
2
1
23rd
1958-1961
128
3
2.34
Henry Pearce (99)
2
1
24th
1961-1963
125
5
4.00
Jim Forbes (93)
2
1
2
25th
1963-1966
129
9
6.97
Wylie Gibbs (94)
2
4
3
26th
1966-1969
130
17
13.07
Mervyn Lee (96)
5
9
3
27th
1969-1972
128
24
18.75
Doug Everingham (93)
11
9
4
28th
1972-1974
126
33
26.19
Doug Everingham (93)
17
10
6
29th
1974-1975
128
44
34.37
Doug Everingham (93)
18
17
9
30th
1975-1977
128
57
44.53
Clarrie Millar (91)
10
36
11
31st
1977-1980
126
66
52.38
Doug Everingham (93)
18
38
11
32nd
1980-1983
131
81
61.83
Doug Everingham (93)
33
35
13
33rd
1983-1984
131
90
68.70
Doug Everingham (93)
57
21
12
34th
1984-1987
149
111
74.49
Clarrie Millar (91)
64
31
16
35th
1987-1990
153
122
79.73
Clarrie Millar (91)
74
33
15
36th
1990-1993
150
131
87.33
Steele Hall (88)
72
44
13
37th
1993-1996
155
137
88.38
Steele Hall (88)
75
44
16
38th
1996-1998
150
139
92.66
Ian Sinclair (87)
49
69
18
39th
1998-2001
152
145
95.39
Garry Nehl (83)
68
61
16
40th
2001-2004
151
146
96.68
Frank Mossfield (81)
65
65
13
3
41st
2004-2007
151
147
97.35
Wilson Tuckey (81)
61
72
12
2
42nd
2007-2010
155
153
98.70
Wilson Tuckey (81)
83
56
11
3
43rd
2010-2013
150
148
98.66
Bronywyn Bishop (74)
72
59
12
5
44th
2013-2016
153
152
99.34
Bronwyn Bishop (74)
56
76
15
5
45th
2016-
150
150
100
Warren Snowdon (67)
69
60
16
5



Federal Election Results 1901-2014

This is a research paper from the Parliamentary Library with statistics on Australian Federal Elections since 1901.

The paper is part of the Research Paper Series 2014-15 and was written by Stephen Barber and Sue Johnson of the Statistics and Mapping Section of the Parliamentary Library.

The paper is shown under the terms of its Creative Commons licence.

It does not contains result of individual seats, but includes aggregate and state-by-state statistics for both Houses on primary votes, two-party-preferred votes, voter turnout, informal votes. It provides state-of-the-party tables for each House and Senate election since 1901. [Read more…]


The Malcolm Mackerras Six And The Question Of How To Define A Landslide

In a weekend newspaper article, the well-known psephologist and election analyst, Malcolm Mackerras, argued that there have only been six federal election “landslide” victories.

In his article, Mackerras nominated the six elections as: 1917, 1929, 1931, 1943, 1966 and 1975.

Mackerras quite rightly objected to the idea that “every second federal election” is a landslide. He described the 2013 election as a “respectable loss” for the ALP but not worthy of being called a landslide.

He said: “However, I have a more rigorous definition, the details of which I have not the space to elaborate now.”

How To Define “Landslide”

I would suggest two essential election statistics as criteria for defining a landslide:

  1. The proportion of House of Representatives seats held by the winning party or parties.
  2. The national two-party-preferred vote achieved by the winning party or parties.

The primary vote achieved by the election winners is also of some interest but since our system of compulsory preferential voting always provides us with a national figure of combined primary and preferred votes the primary vote alone doesn’t necessarily mean much. [Read more…]


John Howard’s Formula For Winning Elections

John Howard has been elected Chairman of the International Democratic Union at its meeting in Washington DC. Delivering the keynote speech, Howard outlined his approach to winning elections, such as exploiting the diminishing ‘tribalisation’ of politics by reaching out to new constituencies.

HowardArguing that it was essential to establish ‘brand identification’, Howard stressed the importance of the role played by talkback radio – the ‘iron lung of Opposition’ – in allowing political leaders to promote their message to younger ‘aspirational’ voters who are less committed to traditional political parties than ever before. He said that these young voters were more conservative and more ‘material’ in their approach to life.

Whilst maintaining that economic management remained an important determinant of electoral behaviour, Howard argued that he had been assisted by an Opposition that failed to ‘define’ itself to the public. In a society with many competing media messages, Howard said it was vital to convey a ‘simple essence’ to the electorate. [Read more…]


The Opposition Leader As A Factor Influencing Voting Behaviour

Australia’s parliamentary elections are increasingly focused around perceptions and packaging of the leaders of the various parties.

The election of Senator Natasha Stott Despoja as the leader of the Australian Democrats in 2001 was an indication of the importance political parties place on leadership as a determinant of the voting patterns of electors.

Prime Minister John Howard’s attacks on Kim Beazley’s supposed lack of “ticker” in the 1998 election was another indication that Opposition leadership can be a factor in elections. [Read more…]


Enrolment Statistics State-By-State 1984-98

These are the statistics showing electoral enrolments at the Close of Rolls in each Federal election between 1984 and 1998.

The Close of Roll figures are calculated following the processing of all enrolment cards received by the date and time specified in the writ as the close of rolls.

Enrolment At Close of Rolls 1984-98
State 1984 1987 1990 1993 1996 1998
NSW
3 424 032
3 555 060
3 607 349
3 793 616
3 926 293
4 031 749
VIC
2 614 383
2 698 034
2 766 263
2 925 654
2 954 596
3 056 887
QLD
1 555 600
1 707 161
1 795 406
1 970 226
2 082 451
2 177 556
WA
859 623
906 677
978 147
1 035 381
1 077 647
1 140 845
SA
906 278
942 880
936 686
1 014 648
989 885
1 006 398
TAS
290 028
300 763
307 846
327 879
325 750
329 751
ACT
150 416
162 717
169 531
190 458
200 828
208 684
NT
68 857
79 921
78 647
91 105
97 740
104 755
AUS
9 869 217
10 353 213
10 666 875
11 348 967
11 655 190
12 056 625

Source: Australian Electoral Commission Publications.



Background Information On Pauline Hanson

Pauline Hanson was elected to the Australian House of Representatives at the general election of March 2, 1996.

She represents the electorate of Oxley in Queensland, an outer metropolitan seat centred on Ispwich.

Hanson was pre-selected as the Liberal candidate, but disendorsed by the Liberal Party during the election campaign because of comments she made concerning aborigines and immigration. However, since she was disendorsed after the close of nominations, she appeared on the ballot paper as a Liberal.

Oxley is a traditionally safe Labor electorate. From 1961 until 1988, the seat was held by the former ALP leader and Governor-General, Bill Hayden.

In 1975, Oxley was the only Queensland electorate retained by the ALP in the election that followed the dismissal of the Whitlam Labor Government.

From October 1988 until the general election of 1996, Oxley was held for the ALP by Les Scott.

Hanson secured a swing of 19.31% to take the seat from the ALP. This was the single biggest swing in any of the 148 electorates in the House of Representatives.

Note: The design of this table has been copied on the One Nation web site (http://www.gwb.com.au/onenation/hanson/vote.html).

Election Result in Oxley (Qld) 2 March 1996
Candidate Party Votes %
Wyles, Carl 765 1.09
Scott, Les ALP 27,497 39.36
Hanson, Pauline IND 33,960 48.61
Pullen, David Roy DEM 4,248 6.08
Robb, Victor IND 1,094 1.57
McKeon, John Robert GRN 1,870 2.68
Chapman, Bill AIP 433 0.62
Formal 69,867 97.15
Informal 2,049 2.85
Total 71,916 94.94
Two Party Preferred Coalition 38,129 54.66
ALP 31,622 45.34