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Gavin Pearce (Lib-Braddon) – Maiden Speech

This is the maiden speech to the House of Representatives by Gavin Pearce, the Liberal member for Braddon, Tasmania.

Listen to Pearce (24m):

Watch Pearce (30m):

Hansard transcript of maiden speech to the House of Representatives by Gavin Pearce, Liberal member for Braddon.

The DEPUTY SPEAKER (Mr S Georganas): Before I call the honourable member for Pearce, I remind the House that this is the honourable member’s first speech. Therefore I ask the House to extend to him the usual courtesies.

Mr PEARCE (Braddon) (17:26): Thanks, Mr Deputy Speaker. May I begin by congratulating our Speaker on his re-election. His position is one of honour and he does it justice. Indeed, to everyone in this place, congratulations. We’re all here today because of the faith our constituents have placed in us, and I wish everyone right across the chamber all the very best for the 46th Parliament. [Read more…]


Sen. Andrew Bragg (Lib-NSW) – Maiden Speech

This is the maiden speech by Senator Andrew Bragg, Liberal, New South Wales.

Listen to Bragg (23m):

Watch Bragg (27m):

Hansard transcript of maiden speech by Senator Andrew Bragg, Liberal, New South Wales.

The PRESIDENT (16:59): It is approaching 5 pm and, pursuant to order, I will now call Senator Bragg to make his first speech. I ask senators that the usual courtesies be extended to him.

Senator BRAGG (New South Wales) (16:59): Mr President, I have a confession to make. I first discovered my love of Australia in Victoria. My upbringing in regional Victoria featured football, fishing and work in orchards, a cannery and a dairy. My interest in politics arose from growing up in a world where tax, trade, foreign investment and water policies all impacted people’s lives. Later came tertiary study, work and—sometimes boring—research, which imbued the notion in me that Australia must be competitive to succeed. [Read more…]


Sen. Claire Chandler (Lib-Tas) – Maiden Speech

This is the maiden speech by Senator Claire Chandler (Liberal-Tasmania).

Listen to Chandler (24m):

Watch Chandler (26m):

Hansard transcript of maiden speech by Senator Claire Chandler (Liberal-Tasmania).

The PRESIDENT (17:28): I will now call Senator Chandler to make her first speech, and again remind honourable senators that the usual courtesies be extended to her.

Senator CHANDLER (Tasmania) (17:28): First of all, I would like to congratulate you, Mr President, on your re-election to your position in the 46th Parliament. The chair in which you now sit it is one that has a proud history and, particularly, a recent history of being occupied by fellow Tasmanians. While you don’t quite fit that moniker, given that you hail from the great and neighbouring state of Victoria I suppose I can accept that’s the next best thing! [Read more…]


Gladys Liu (Lib-Chisholm) – Maiden Speech

This is the maiden speech delivered to the House of Representatives by Gladys Liu, the Liberal member for Chisholm, Victoria.

Liu

Liu is the first Chinese Australian woman elected to the House of Representatives. Her family has operated a number of small businesses in the Chisholm area. She previously worked as an adviser to Victorian Premier Ted Baillieu. She unsuccessfully contested the Victorian Legislative Council election in 2014.

Liu won Chisholm at the May 18, 2019 elections. She replaced Julia Banks, who won the seat for the Liberal Party in 2016 and resigned to sit as an independent following the overthrow of Malcolm Turnbull in August 2018. Banks unsuccessfully contested Flinders as an independent at the election. The Liberal member for Flinders, Greg Hunt, can be seen linking arms with Liu at the end of her speech.

Chisholm is in the eastern suburbs of Melbourne. Predominantly residential, it is based around Box Hill, Blackburn, Mount Waverley and Glen Waverley.

Liu won the seat with 50.57% of the two-party-preferred vote, a swing against the Liberal Party of 2.34%. The Liberal Party’s primary vote 43.38%, a decrease of 3.71%. The ALP polled 34.30% of the primary vote, a decrease of 0.39%. The Greens polled 11.84%, up 0.30%.

Chisholm is now the most marginal seat in Victoria, held by 1,090 votes. It is the Morrison government’s second most marginal seat in the nation. Bass is the most marginal, held by 563 votes, or 0.41%.

Listen to Liu (20m):

Watch Liu (24m):

Hansard transcript of maiden speech by Gladys Liu (Liberal-Chisholm).

The SPEAKER (16:57): Before I call the honourable member for Chisholm, I remind the House that this is the honourable member’s first speech and I ask the House to extend to her the usual courtesies.

Ms LIU (Chisholm) (16:57): I am thankful to rise to speak in the Parliament of Australia for the first time and for the opportunity to represent the people of Chisholm, who have entrusted me to be their voice in this place. It is a wonderful example of the welcoming character of Australians that my electorate has sent a woman born in Hong Kong to speak for them in the parliament. We are so fortunate to live in a country where migrants can come to Australia, become Australians and serve its people here in the parliament. How good is Australia? [Read more…]


Melissa McIntosh (Lib-Lindsay) – Maiden Speech

This is the maiden speech by Melissa McIntosh, the NSW Liberal member for Lindsay.

McIntosh

McIntosh, 41, was elected at the May 18, 2019 election. She attended Western Sydney University and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in journalism and communications. She was a communications manager with the not-for-profit Wentworth Community Housing at the time of her election.

The western Sydney seat of Lindsay was created in 1984. It includes Badgerys Creek, Castlereagh, Emu Plains, Mulgoa, Penrith and Werrington.

McIntosh is the sixth member for Lindsay, and its third Liberal. Each of her two predecessors, one Liberal and one Labor, survived only one term. McIntosh defeated the former ALP state minister Diane Beamer, following the disendorsement of the sitting Labor member, Emma Husar.

McIntosh secured a 6.15% two-party swing to the Liberal Party. She increased the Liberal primary vote by 7.16% to 46.45%. The ALP primary decreased by 5.47% to 35.61%.

Listen to McIntosh (27m):

Watch McIntosh (28m):

Hansard transcript of maiden speech by Melissa McIntosh, Liberal member for Lindsay.

The SPEAKER: Before I call the honourable member for Lindsay, I remind the House that this is the honourable member’s first speech. I ask the House to extend to her the usual courtesies.

McIntosh

Mrs MCINTOSH (Lindsay) (12:03): Mr Speaker, colleagues, family and friends that are here today, Lindsay is in so many ways a microcosm of the Australian community. It’s got families, it’s got retired people, it’s got lots and lots of small businesses and it’s got a very strong community spirit. These are the words of former Prime Minister Howard OM AC on his visit to Lindsay during the campaign—and, as always, former Prime Minister Howard is right—’From Menzies’ forgotten people to Howard’s battlers to Morrison’s quite Australians, Lindsay has been and will remain a microcosm of Australia.’ [Read more…]


Bridget Archer (Lib-Bass) – Maiden Speech

This is the maiden speech to the House of Representatives by Bridget Archer, the Liberal member for the Tasmanian electorate of Bass.

Archer

Bass is located in north-eastern Tasmania. It is centred on Launceston and includes Dorset, George Town, West Tamar and Flinders Island.

Archer secured 42.33% of the primary vote, an increase of 3.14%. She won 50.41% of the two-party-preferred vote, a swing of 5.83%. She defeated the one-term ALP member Ross Hart. Bass has now changed parties at five of the last six elections.

Archer, 44, was previously the Mayor of George Town Council.

Watch Archer’s speech (21m):

Listen to Archer’s speech (19m):

Hansard transcript of maiden speech by Bridget Archer, Liberal member for Bass.

Mrs ARCHER (Bass) (09:56): I second the motion.

The SPEAKER: I remind the House that this is the honourable member’s first speech, and I ask the House to extend to her the usual courtesies.

Mrs ARCHER: Thank you, Mr Speaker. I thank the Prime Minister for the privilege of participating in the address-in-reply here today, and I commend the member for Herbert on his very moving first speech. I also acknowledge that the very first duty of our new Governor-General was the opening of this 46th Parliament of Australia. I wish General and Mrs Hurley the very best as they embark on their official duties. I also congratulate you, Mr Speaker, on your re-election to the chair. The commentary from both sides of this chamber reflects the high regard in which you are held. [Read more…]


Cory Bernardi Disbands Australian Conservatives Party

Senator Cory Bernardi has announced that he will disband the Australian Conservatives party, following its poor showing in the recent federal election.

Bernardi defected to the Australian Conservatives in February 2017, seven months after his re-election as a Liberal Party senator from South Australia. The party had been founded a year earlier as a right-wing activist group. He claimed the new party was opposed to the left-wing direction of the Liberal Party under then prime minister Malcolm Turnbull.

Shortly after its formation, the party was merged with Family First, which gave up its well-developed political identity.

The Australian Conservatives won just 102,769 Senate votes (0.70%) nationwide at the May 18 election. Its best result was 1.47% in South Australia, its worst 0.42% in Western Australia. The party did not contest House seats.

It is not known what Bernardi’s longer-term intentions are. Media reports suggest he may return to the Liberal Party, which he has reliably supported during his self-imposed exile. Some reports say he may leave parliament altogether.

Bernardi became a senator in May 2006, filling a casual vacancy left by the retirement of Robert Hill. He was re-elected in 2007 from the number one position on the Liberal Party ticket. In 2013, he was re-elected, again from the number one position. He was re-elected at the 2016 double dissolution election from the number two position.

Bernardi issued the statement shown below:

19-06-21_conservatives-statement_bernardi


Scott Morrison Announces Third Term Coalition Ministry

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has announced his new ministry, following the coalition’s re-election on May 18.

Morrison

The major positions in the government are unchanged, with Josh Frydenberg remaining Treasurer and Mathias Cormann holding Finance. Marise Payne stays as Foreign Minister, whilst Linda Reynolds retains Defence. Peter Dutton remains Minister for Home Affairs, Greg Hunt stays in Health, Simon Birmingham in Trade and Dan Tehan in Education.

Melissa Price has been dropped from the Cabinet after a poor performance in Environment. She will now be Minister for Defence Industry. Sussan Ley returns to the Cabinet in the Environment portfolio.

Senator Arthur Sinodinos has been appointed Ambassador to the United States. He will take up the position when Joe Hockey’s term expires early next year. Sinodinos’ departure from the Senate may allow the Liberal Party to re-appoint Senator Jim Molan, who lost his seat at the election.

Senator Mitch Fifield will leave the Communications portfolio and will be replaced by Paul Fletcher. Fifield will also leave the Senate to take up the post of Ambassador to the United Nations. His Senate casual vacancy could go to Sarah Henderson, who lost her seat of Corangamite at the election. [Read more…]


Julia Banks (Lib-Chisholm) Turns Independent

The member for the Victorian electorate of Chisholm, Julia Banks, has announced that she is resigning from the Liberal Party to sit as an independent in the House of Representatives, plunging the Morrison government further into minority status.

Banks had previously announced that she would not contest Chisholm again as a Liberal. She has suggested she might run in Chisholm, or elsewhere, as an independent.

Banks won Chisholm at the 2016 federal election. It was the only seat the Liberal Party captured from the Labor Party. The ALP’s Anna Burke had held the seat since 1998.

A redistribution means the redrawn Chisholm will be based around the suburbs of Box Hill, Blackburn, Mount Waverley and Glen Waverley. It has a notional Liberal majority of 3.4%. Last Saturday’s Victorian state election saw the seats of Box Hill and Mount Waverley lost by the Liberal Party to the ALP with swings of 7.5% and 6.0% respectively. The Blackburn-based electorate of Forest Hill, whilst retained by the Liberal Party, registered a 3.0% swing to the ALP.

Bank’s announcement in the House came at the beginning of the day’s proceedings. It coincided with a press conference by Prime Minister Scott Morrison. The coalition government now holds just 74 of the 150 seats in the House, having already lost former PM Malcolm Turnbull’s seat of Wentworth to Dr Kerryn Phelps, also an independent. There are now seven crossbenchers in the House. The ALP has 69 seats.

  • Listen to Banks’ statement (5m)
  • Watch Bank’s statement (5m)

Hansard transcript of statement by Julia Banks, former Liberal member for Chisholm.

Ms BANKS (Chisholm) (12:01): Mr Speaker, on indulgence, may I make a personal statement?

The SPEAKER: Yes, the member for Chisholm may proceed.

Ms BANKS: Thank you, Mr Speaker. Following the leadership coup in August, I announced my decision that I will not recontest the seat of Chisholm at the next election as a member of the Liberal Party. I’ve always put the people before the party. After being a Labor held seat for 18 years, the people of Chisholm elected me as I promised them that I would be their representative under the leadership of the former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and former deputy leader and foreign minister Julie Bishop—both visionary, inspiring leaders of sensible, centrist, liberal values with integrity and intellect, and with significant support from my local community, and across Australia, as leaders of our nation. [Read more…]


Until The Bell Rings – Speech By Prime Minister Scott Morrison

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has made his first major speech to a gathering of Liberals in Albury, the birthplace of the modern Liberal Party.

Morrison

Morrison spoke at a function organised by the Menzies Institute. He was introduced by newly-reinstated parliamentary secretary, Assistant Minister for Regional Development and Territories, Sussan Ley.

Billed as a “headland” speech, Morrison delivered the speech without notes. He outlined no new policies. The speech touched briefly upon Liberal ideas such as community, home ownership and freedom.

  • Listen to Morrison’s speech (29m)

Official transcript of Scott Morrison’s speech in Albury.

Thank you very much Sussan for the very warm welcome to Jenny and I, and to my senior colleagues here particularly my Deputy Leader here, Josh Frydenberg and I, the ‘ScoJo’ team, as we’ve been dubbed amongst other things. I don’t know if that one will stick Josh, but let’s see how we go. Can I also acknowledge the Indigenous people and the land on which we stand and where we meet today, and acknowledge elders past and present and pay my respects to them, our first Australians.

I like rituals. I’m a keen fan of rituals. I try and create rituals in my family, Jen and I, we have a number of rituals with our kids. We had them when I was growing up as a kid. They’re important because they help you connect and remind you about the things that matter most. They connect you to your past, and they help you connect your past to your future. Just as Indigenous peoples have been doing for centuries, thousands of years. I like rituals. [Read more…]