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Sen. Claire Chandler (Lib-Tas) – Maiden Speech

This is the maiden speech by Senator Claire Chandler (Liberal-Tasmania).

Listen to Chandler (24m):

Watch Chandler (26m):

Hansard transcript of maiden speech by Senator Claire Chandler (Liberal-Tasmania).

The PRESIDENT (17:28): I will now call Senator Chandler to make her first speech, and again remind honourable senators that the usual courtesies be extended to her.

Senator CHANDLER (Tasmania) (17:28): First of all, I would like to congratulate you, Mr President, on your re-election to your position in the 46th Parliament. The chair in which you now sit it is one that has a proud history and, particularly, a recent history of being occupied by fellow Tasmanians. While you don’t quite fit that moniker, given that you hail from the great and neighbouring state of Victoria I suppose I can accept that’s the next best thing! [Read more…]


Sen. Susan McDonald (Nats-Qld) – Maiden Speech

This is the maiden speech by Senator Susan McDonald (Nationals-Queensland).

Listen to McDonald (23m):

Watch McDonald (29m):

Hansard transcript of maiden speech by Senator Susan McDonald (Nationals-Queensland).

The PRESIDENT (16:59): Pursuant to order, we’ll now move to first speeches. I call upon Senator McDonald to make her first speech and ask honourable senators that the usual courtesies be extended to her.

Senator MCDONALD (Queensland) (16:59): It is with much pride that I stand before you to make my first speech in the Senate. It is an incredible privilege to be elected by Queenslanders to be their voice in the Australian parliament in the Senate, the house that makes the ultimate determination on the passage of legislation. I take my seat in this chamber not because of any quota and not because of any faction. I do not believe in identity politics, because that leaves behind people who do not share that same identity. [Read more…]


David Hurley Sworn In As 27th Governor-General Of Australia

Retired General David Hurley has been sworn in as Australia’s 27th Governor-General.

Hurley
David Hurley takes the oath of office as Governor-General

The ceremony to install Hurley in place of Sir Peter Cosgrove took place in the Senate chamber at Parliament House.

Hurley, 65, was the 38th Governor of New South Wales from 2014 to 2019.

Listen to the swearing-in ceremony (16m):

Watch the swearing-in ceremony (16m):


Fiona Patten Not Happy Malcolm Roberts Has Been Re-Elected

The Victorian Reason Party MP Fiona Patten has reacted badly to the re-election of Malcolm Roberts as a One Nation senator from Queensland.

Patten, a member of the Victorian Legislative Council, described Roberts as a “climate-change denying, weirdo, conspiracy theorist”.

“You’re f***ing kidding me right?” Patten wrote.

Malcolm Roberts’ election to the Senate was confirmed this week. First elected at the double dissolution in 2016, Roberts was ruled ineligible to nominate by the High Court on October 27, 2017. Roberts held dual citizenship with the United Kingdom, a breach of Section 44 of the Constitution.

Patten was elected to the Victorian parliament as a representative of the Sex Party in 2014. The party was renamed the Reason Party and she was re-elected in 2018.

Media release from Fiona Patten.

Fiona Patten


Sen. Duncan Spender (LDP-NSW) – Maiden Speech

This is the maiden speech by Senator Duncan Spender, Liberal Democratic Party, New South Wales.

Spender

Spender was appointed by the NSW Parliament on March 20, 2019, to fill the casual vacancy created by the resignation of Senator David Leyonhjelm.

Spender was sworn in on April 2. He gave a brief statement of condolence for the Christchuch shooting victims on April 2. This is his first speech the next day. He spoke again later on the Budget. The Senate then adjourned and an election was subsequently held on May 18.

Spender was not re-elected. His Senate term lasted for three months and ten days.

David Leyonhjelm, who resigned to contest the election for the NSW Legislative Council on March 23, failed to be elected.

Listen to Spender’s speech (24m)

Watch Spender’s speech (26m):

Hansard transcript of the first speech by Senator Duncan Spender, Liberal Democratic Party, NSW.

The PRESIDENT (17:25): Order! I remind senators this is the first speech of Senator Spender, and I ask them to maintain the normal courtesies.

Senator SPENDER (New South Wales) (17:25): Thank you, senators, for indulging me with this opportunity, at the busy time that it is, to deliver my maiden speech. Like many of you, I will be facing the electorate in a matter of weeks. So, if I don’t win, this speech will double as a maiden speech and a valedictory speech, which might be a first, so I might even get into Odgers, which is great. [Read more…]


Sen. David Smith (ALP-ACT) – Maiden Speech

Senator David Smith has delivered his maiden speech to the Senate.

Smith

Smith, 48, is a Labor senator, representing the Australian Capital Territory. He was elected in a special recount of votes from the 2016 election, following the disqualification of Katy Gallagher for dual citizenship under Section 44 of the Constitution. He was declared elected by the High Court on May 23, 2018 and sworn in on June 18.

Prior to his election, Smith was the ACT Director of Professionals Australia. He previously worked as an advisor in the Department of Employment and Workplace Relations, an industrial relations manager for the Australian Federal Police Association and a policy advisor in the ACT Chief Minister’s Department.

Smith’s term expires with the next dissolution of the House of Representatives. Katy Gallagher was this week endorsed by the Left faction to contest an August preselection against Smith, a former convenor of the Right faction.

  • Listen to Smith’s speech (22m)
  • Watch Smith’s speech (25m)

Hansard transcript of maiden speech by Senator David Smith.

The PRESIDENT (17:03): Order! Before I call Senator Smith, I remind honourable senators that this is his first speech and, therefore, I ask that the usual courtesies be extended to him. [Read more…]


Sen. Amanda Stoker (LNP-Qld) – Maiden Speech

Senator Amanda Stoker has delivered her maiden speech to the Senate.

Stoker

Stoker, 35, is a member of the Queensland Liberal National Party. She will sit with the Liberal Party in Canberra. Stoker was appointed on March 21, 2018, to fill a casual vacancy created by the resignation of Senator George Brandis, the government’s former Senate leader. Brandis is now the Australian High Commissioner to London.

The 99th woman elected to the Senate, Stoker is a barrister who specialised in commercial and administrative law. She became a solicitor in 2006 and practiced at Minter Ellison in Sydney. A former associate of retired High Court Justice Ian Callinan, she commenced at the bar in 2011.

In her preselection for the casual vacancy, Stoker defeated former Senator Joanna Lindgren, who served for one year between 2015 and 2016.

  • Listen to Stoker’s speech (25m)
  • Watch Stoker’s speech (29m)

Hansard transcript of maiden speech by Senator Amanda Stoker.

The PRESIDENT (17:02): I ask senators to remember the traditional courtesies for a first speech and to observe them.

Senator STOKER (Queensland) (17:02): Australians don’t trust politicians. It’s a universal truth. In fact, Australians are losing faith across the four sectors of the economy—government, media, corporate and non-government organisations. But for my new role as senator for Queensland it is concerning—most concerning—that people’s trust in Australia’s institution of government, which has delivered peace and stability in this country for more than 100 years, is among the lowest globally. [Read more…]