WEL 1998 Election Form Guide

Gun Laws

Women's groups have had a long interest in reducing violence and gun control has been high on their priorities. Uniform national gun laws are therefore a priority and we are concerned that progress made will not be whittled away by states watering down the agreements made under the leadership of the present Prime Minister.

1993-96 under Labor +1

Positives

Labor stated that it supported uniform laws and stricter laws than we had, but was unable to bring it about except for the tightening of importation of military rifles.

Negatives

No action in this period. Labor did very little and were nervous of gun control because of the NSW state election in 1988.

1996-98 under the Liberal/National Party Coalition +4

Positives

The Howard leadership persuaded the states and territories to agree at the Australian Police Ministers Council of May 1996 to strict and uniform laws. Imposed a levy to implement the gun buy-back scheme and destroyed 640,000 guns. Registration of all guns and proof of a reason to own guns was implemented. No guns are allowed where domestic violence has occurred.

Negatives

Several jurisdictions have since departed from the agreement by watering down the laws and have not been seriously criticised by the Coalition.

Election Promises by Labor +1

Positives

Will retain current measures.

Negatives

Is not looking at a referendum or blueprint law that would create uniform gun laws rather than leave the possibility of widening loopholes as each state interprets the 11 points of agreement.

Election Promises by Liberal/National Party Coalition +1

Positives

Will retain current measures.

Negatives

Is not looking at a referendum or blueprint law which would create uniform gun laws rather than leave the possibility of widening loopholes as each state interprets the 11 points of agreement.

SCORE Labor +2
Coalition -5

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Page created 20 September 1998; last updated 20 September 1998