Can You Help?

This website is in imminent danger of being shut down. It has been online since 1995, but the personal circumstances of the owner, Malcolm Farnsworth, are such that economies have to be made. Server costs and suchlike have become prohibitive. At the urging of people online, I have agreed to see if Patreon provides a solution. More information is available at the Patreon website. If you are able to contribute even $1.00/month to keep the site running, please click the Patreon button below.


Become a Patron!


Fiona Phillips (ALP-Gilmore) – Maiden Speech

This is the maiden speech to the House of Representatives by Fiona Phillips, the ALP member for Gilmore, New South Wales.

Listen to Phillips (22m):

Watch Phillips (24m):

Hansard transcript of maiden speech by Fiona Phillips, ALP member for Gilmore.

The SPEAKER (12:02): Before I call the honourable member for Gilmore I remind the House that this is the honourable member’s first speech. I ask the House to extend to her the usual courtesies.

Mrs PHILLIPS (Gilmore) (12:02): I acknowledge that we’re gathered here today on Ngunawal country. I acknowledge all the First Nations people on the New South Wales South Coast and the many tribes, groups and clans that make up the Yuin and Dharawal nations. I pay my respects to elders past, present and emerging and acknowledge the presence of Uncle Tom Moore, a respected elder in our community, who has joined us here in the gallery today. I thank our local Aboriginal elders that I have met over many years through work and community. I am profoundly grateful for knowing you and what you continue to do in our community each day. At a National Sorry Day reconciliation walk in May I joined with hundreds of locals on the walk from Nowra to the Bomaderry Aboriginal Children’s Home. This home played a heartbreaking role in the stolen generation. The community came together, from babies to adults, to listen, to learn and to heal with former residents and their families. As the member for Gilmore I will continue to walk with you on our journey to reconciliation. [Read more…]


Undecided Seats: Turnbull Edges Towards Narrow Victory

11.45pm – A path to a narrow victory for the Turnbull government emerged in today’s counting of votes for seats in the House of Representatives.

The five undecided seats in which the Coalition previously led have now been listed as settled: Gilmore, Chisholm, Dunkley, Barker and Grey. In all of these the Liberal Party’s lead grew as postal and other declaration votes were added to the count. In the case of the latter two South Australian electorates, where the Nick Xenophon Team emerged as the main opposition to the Liberals, the counting of two-candidate-preferred has confirmed the seats as retained by the Liberals.

Similarly, I have removed Melbourne Ports from the list of undecided seats. Preference flows mean that the seat is not likely to see the Greens take second place ahead of the ALP.

However, counting today revealed that the Queensland electorate of Flynn has come into play. This seat had been classified as an ALP gain but counting of postal votes saw a large drop in the ALP’s lead, from 1824 to 1065. LNP officials are said to be very confident that a 65% flow of preferences from postal votes makes the seat winnable.

These changes mean that the Coalition now has 73 seats, the ALP 66, and Others 5. [Read more…]


Update On Undecided Seats – Hung Parliament Looks Most Likely

11.39pm – Today I have removed 4 seats from the list of undecideds.

The 4 seats no longer considered undecided are: Robertson, Batman, La Trobe and Petrie.

Their removal means that the Coalition now has 68 seats, the ALP 66, and Others 5.

Of the 11 remaining seats in doubt, the Coalition is ahead in 5 and the ALP is ahead in 6. If these seats were to stay that way, the Coalition would finish with 73 seats, the ALP 72, and Others 5. The government would be three seats short of an absolute majority and we would have a hung Parliament.

Many media reports say there are only 8 or 9 doubtful seats. I have included Barker and Grey because the Australian Electoral Commission has not finished the reordering of two-party-preferred votes (Labor v. Liberal) to two-candidate-preferred (Liberal v. Xenophon). Both seats are likely to remain with the Liberals.

I have also included Melbourne Ports in the list of doubtful seats. There is a possibility that the full distribution of preferences could see the Greens overtake the ALP and move into second place. ALP preferences could then elect either the Green or Liberal candidate. The incumbent Labor MP, Michael Danby, issued a how-to-vote card that placed the Liberal candidate ahead of the Green. This adds an extra complication to predictions for this seat.

Ten seats in the table all have a margin of close-to or less than 1000 votes. Most have a margin of less than 1%. Experience shows that a margin of 1000 votes is unlikely to be reversed by postal, absent and declaration votes, although this varies widely between electorates.

There is a case to be made that Forde is the only doubtful seat left, but such a judgment is somewhat premature. The picture should be clearer by the end of Wednesday, July 6, after the counting of more postal votes.
[Read more…]


Ann Sudmalis (Lib – Gilmore) – First Speech

Ann Sudmalis was first elected as the Liberal member for Gilmore at the 2013 federal election.

Sudmalis

Sudmalis succeeded the popular Joanna Gash in one of the few seats that swung to the ALP in the election. Gash had held the seat since 1996. Since its creating in 1984, Gilmore has been held by The Nationals, the ALP and the Liberals.

Situated south of Sydney, Gilmore extends from Warilla in the north to Durras in the South, then west including much of the Budawang and Morton National Parks. It includes the towns and suburbs of Berry, Bomaderry, Gerringong, Kangaroo Valley, Kiama, Milton, Minnamurra, Nowra, Shellharbour, Shell Cove, Sussex Inlet, Ulladulla and Warilla. [Read more…]