Clinton Impeachment Trial: Henry Hyde’s Summation Of The Case Against Clinton

This is Henry Hyde’s summation of the case against President Bill Clinton in the Senate impeachment trial.

Hyde, a Republican congressman from Illinois, was the Lead House Manager and Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee.

During his speech, Hyde read from a schoolboy’s letter. The letter, from William Summers, is shown at the end of this page.

Henry Hyde’s summation of the case against President Clinton.

HOUSE JUDICIARY CHAIRMAN REP. HENRY HYDE (R-ILLINOIS): Thank you, Mr. Chief Justice.

Mr. Chief Justice, counsel for the president, distinguished members of the Senate, 139 years ago — 136 years ago at a small military cemetery in Pennsylvania, one of Illinois’ most illustrious sons asked a haunting question: Whether a nation conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal can long endure. [Read more…]


Clinton Impeachment Trial: House Manager Henry Hyde’s Opening Statement

This is the opening statement by House Judiciary Committee Chairman Henry Hyde in the Senate impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton.

Hyde headed the House Managers who handled the carriage of the trial on behalf of the House of Representatives.

Opening statement by Henry Hyde in the Clinton impeachment trial.

HOUSE JUDICIARY COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN HENRY HYDE (R-ILLINOIS): Mr. Chief Justice, distinguished counsel for the president and senators. We are brought together on this solemn and historic occasion to perform important duties assigned to us by the Constitution. [Read more…]


Impeachment Trial: Henry Hyde’s Presentation to the Senate

This is the opening presentation by Henry Hyde of the House Managers’ case in the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton.

Presentation to the Senate by Henry Hyde.

Mr. President, the managers on the part of the House of Representatives are here and present, and ready to present the articles of impeachment which have been preferred by the House of Representatives against William Jefferson Clinton, president of the United States.

The House adopted the following resolution which, with the permission of the Senate, I will read. [Read more…]


Clinton Impeachment Trial: Profiles of the House Managers

Thirteen Republican members of the House Judiciary Committee have been appointed as “managers” who will serve as prosecutors in the trial.

Every one of the House prosecutors has worked as a lawyer, but their experience varies widely.

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REP. BOB BARR, Ga., 50, elected 1994

DUTIES: Outline how president’s conduct relates to obstruction of justice and perjury laws.

Long before Monica Lewinsky became a household name, Barr introduced the first impeachment resolution against Clinton over alleged fund-raising irregularities and other matters. The conservative, who has co-authored an anti-Clinton book, introduced House Res. 304 in November 1997, a resolution directing the Judiciary Committee to investigate whether grounds existed to impeach Clinton. Some members of his own party criticized Barr for that, although the measure did garner 22 Republican cosponsors. Barr also is closely allied with the National Rifle Association and is vocal about gun ownership issues. [Read more…]


Henry Hyde’s Letter To Trent Lott Regarding Impeachment Trial

Following the impeachment of President Bill Clinton by the House of Representatives, Henry Hyde wrote to Senator Trent Lott regarding arrangements for the trial.

Hyde was Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee. Lott was the Republican Senate leader.

Text of Henry Hyde’s letter to Senator Trent Lott.

Dear Majority Leader Lott:

The press has recently reported a great deal of speculation about how the Senate may organize and conduct a Senate impeachment trial of President Clinton. The twelve other managers and I have discussed this matter at great length, and as the parties who must present and manage the case for conviction and removal on behalf of the House of Representatives, we fully agree with your remarks that “We (the Senate) need to go forward and do our constitutional duty to hear the evidence.” However, we have concerns with your proposal that the parties call no witnesses during the Senate’s consideration of the articles. We are also concerned with your proposal that you might foreclose any trial if the House position fails to get a two-thirds vote on a preliminary motion before the Senate has even had a full airing of the evidence. This proposal effectively grants one-third of the Senate the power to decide whether there will be any airing of the evidence. [Read more…]


Kenneth Starr’s Testimony Before The House Judiciary Committee – 7/7

This is the seventh of seven pages with the full text of Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr’s testimony before the House Judiciary Committee.

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7

Kenneth Starr testimony before the House Judiciary Committee.

Transcript of House Judiciary Committee Hearing Following Starr’s Testimony.

HYDE: Everybody stay, please. The committee will stay. Maxine, don’t go.

(APPLAUSE)

HYDE: We’re going to have a meeting.

(APPLAUSE)

HYDE: Ladies and gentlemen, the committee hearing stands adjourned, but the committee will remain here for a very short meeting. [Read more…]


Kenneth Starr’s Testimony Before The House Judiciary Committee – 6/7

This is the sixth of seven pages with the full text of Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr’s testimony before the House Judiciary Committee.

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7

Kenneth Starr testimony before the House Judiciary Committee.

House Majority Counsel’s Examination of Kenneth Starr Before the House Judiciary Committee.

HYDE: Mr. Starr, do you want a little break?

STARR: No, Mr. Chairman.

HYDE: OK, we’re at the final…

STARR: We’re almost at my bedtime.

HYDE: We’re past mine, I can assure you. The gentlelady from California. [Read more…]