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Sen. Duncan Spender (LDP-NSW) – Maiden Speech

This is the maiden speech by Senator Duncan Spender, Liberal Democratic Party, New South Wales.

Spender

Spender was appointed by the NSW Parliament on March 20, 2019, to fill the casual vacancy created by the resignation of Senator David Leyonhjelm.

Spender was sworn in on April 2. He gave a brief statement of condolence for the Christchuch shooting victims on April 2. This is his first speech the next day. He spoke again later on the Budget. The Senate then adjourned and an election was subsequently held on May 18.

Spender was not re-elected. His Senate term lasted for three months and ten days.

David Leyonhjelm, who resigned to contest the election for the NSW Legislative Council on March 23, failed to be elected.

Listen to Spender’s speech (24m)

Watch Spender’s speech (26m):

Hansard transcript of the first speech by Senator Duncan Spender, Liberal Democratic Party, NSW.

The PRESIDENT (17:25): Order! I remind senators this is the first speech of Senator Spender, and I ask them to maintain the normal courtesies.

Senator SPENDER (New South Wales) (17:25): Thank you, senators, for indulging me with this opportunity, at the busy time that it is, to deliver my maiden speech. Like many of you, I will be facing the electorate in a matter of weeks. So, if I don’t win, this speech will double as a maiden speech and a valedictory speech, which might be a first, so I might even get into Odgers, which is great. [Read more…]


2016 House Of Representatives Primary Votes: State-By-State Breakdown

Despite a declining vote, the Coalition and the ALP maintained their dominance of the House of Representatives in the July 2 double dissolution.

The Coalition (Liberal, Liberal National, Nationals, Country Liberals) and ALP polled 76.77% of the nationwide primary vote, down 2.16% from 78.93% in 2013. They secured 145 (96.7%) of the 150 seats in the House of Representatives.

The Big Two + Greens

The Greens polled 10.23% of the primary vote, up 1.58% from their 2013 tally of 8.65%. Adam Bandt consolidated his hold on Melbourne but the party failed to win any more lower house seats.

The Coalition, ALP and Greens combined polled 87% of first preference (primary) votes nationally, marginally down from 87.58% in 2013. They won 146 (97.3%) of the 150 seats in the House of Representatives.

The Greens maintained their influence with the lion’s share of preferences. These preferences were vital to the ALP holding 8 of its seats and winning another 7 from the Liberal Party.

A Big Field of Micro Parties With Micro Votes

There were 42 parties that contested at least one seat each. They polled a total of 10.17%. Only the Nick Xenophon Team (Mayo) and Katter’s Australian Party (Kennedy) won seats.

The majority of micro parties (32 of 42) contested 10 or fewer seats. Twenty-four of these contested 5 or fewer seats. Whilst 10 parties ran more than 10 candidates each, they all nominated candidates for fewer than half the seats in the House. Family First ran in 65 seats, the Christian Democratic Party in 55 and the Animal Justice Party in 41.

The votes for micro parties were derisory, with 38 of the 42 failing to make it to 1% nationally. Moreover, 27 polled less than 0.1% nationally. The other 11 polled no higher than 0.7%. [Read more…]


One Nation Wins Another Seat In NSW; Coalition Loses One More, Leyonhjelm Returns; Crossbench Grows To 20

The Senate results for New South Wales were finalised and announced this morning.

The Coalition retained 5 of its 6 senators, the ALP 4, the Greens 1 and Liberal Democrats 1. The final place was taken by One Nation.

The final composition of the Senate is now:

  • Coalition 30 (-3)
  • ALP 26 (+1)
  • Greens 9 (-1)
  • One Nation 4 (+4)
  • Nick Xenophon Team 3 (+2)
  • Liberal Democrats 1 (-)
  • Derryn Hinch’s Justice Party 1 (+1)
  • Family First 1 (-)
  • Jacqui Lambie Network 1 (-)
  • TOTAL = 76

The Coalition polled 35.85% of the primary vote and secured the re-election of its 5 senators – Marise Payne, Arthur Sinodinos, Fiona Nash (Nats), Connie Fierravanti-Wells and John Williams (Nats).

The Coalition has failed to replace Bill Heffernan, who retired at the election. Hollie Hughes, who at one stage threatened the Fierravanti-Wells’ position, has not been elected.

The ALP polled 31.28%, enough to return its 4 incumbent senators: Sam Dastyari, Jenny McAllister, Deborah O’Neill and Doug Cameron.

The Greens polled 7.41%, re-electing Lee Rhiannon to a second term.

Pauline Hanson’s One Nation polled 4.10% of the vote and elected Brian Burston. His election means that One Nation will have 4 senators in the new parliament.

The Liberal Democrats secured the re-election of David Leyonhjelm, off a primary vote of 3.09%. [Read more…]


Nominations – House of Representatives & Senate 2016

The table on this page shows the full list of candidate for the House of Representatives and Senate in the 2016 Federal Election.

Candidates may be searched for by name, party, seat, state or occupation.

Each column can be reordered and the data can be saved or printed. [Read more…]


Sen. David Leyonhjelm (LDP-NSW) – Maiden Speech

Senator David Leyonhjelm, the first Liberal Democratic Party member of the Australian Parliament, has given his maiden speech.

Leyonhjelm

Leyonhjelm was elected to represent New South Wales. His term began on July 1 and will expire on June 30, 2020.

Senator Leyonhjelm devoted most of his speech to outlining his political philosophy. Whilst conceding he was a libertarian, Leyonhjelm said he preferred the term “classical liberal”. [Read more…]